6 Mobile Apps for Your Job Hunt

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It seems like there’s an app for everything now, and job hunting is no different. With unemployment holding steady at 8.1%, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job seekers are using any tool available to get ahead of the crowd. Plus, what’s easier than using your mobile device?
These days, you can use your phone to watch movies and set reminders — among a host of other pretty snazzy and sophisticated tasks. As Zooey Deschanel proved, the iPhone’s Siri can tell if you it’s raining — even looking out the window is a thing of the past. So why not utilize all that technology to get a leg up in the job arena? You certainly wouldn’t be the only one with this idea: 77% of job seekers have already jumped on the app bandwagon.
Here are some apps for job seekers looking to take their search on the go.

1. LunchMeet


LunchMeet is more than just a clever name to make you hungry — it’s also a great networking app.
The service connects to your LinkedIn account and uses geo-targeting to find industry-specific contacts who may be open to networking. Just connect through LunchMeet, grab lunch or coffee and discuss your industry or career opportunities.
If you’re looking to expand your business circle, this could be the app for you. It’s also a great way to find a mentor or discover a hidden job lead.

2. Interview Prep Questions for iPhone and Android


Are you freaking out because you have a big interview coming up? Turn on your phone and start practicing.
Interview Prep Questions has a name that really sums up the functionality of the app. It can be difficult to foresee those tough questions that pop up in interviews, so you can prepare for a wide variety of potential queries with this handy database. The app offers practice questions and will even suggest answers if you’re stumped. You can then take those answers and personalize them so they fit your unique qualifications and background.
Preparation is the name of the game when it comes to interviewing, and this app helps you prepare on the go.

3. SparkHire for iPhone


You’ve found the perfect job and you’ve gotten called up for an interview. Now you can put those car keys down and pick up your mobile device. SparkHire, a video resume, interviewing and job board site, has just launched an app version of their video interviewing platform.
Employers can present multiple text-based questions to job seekers who, in turn, respond with short video answers. These video answers can then be viewed by employers anywhere and anytime, which means you can show off your communication skills and personality without taking too much time out of your busy schedule. The app is perfect for passive job seekers who are currently employed, as they can easily interview during normal business hours without going AWOL for hours at a time.

Apps 4 – 6 and complete Mashable article

Heather R. Huhman is the founder and president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for organizations with products that target job seekers and/or employers. You can connect with Heather and Come Recommended on Twitter and Facebook.

How to Find a Mentor and Why You Need One

By Lindsay Olson

One of the best ways to reinvigorate your work life, boost your job search, or help guide your career path is to work with a mentor. A mentor can help guide you through common problems and make recommendations on how to improve your job performance.

Talking to a mentor about your career can help you make better decisions about moving to a new job, taking a promotion or asking for a raise. Typically, you would work with someone with experience in your industry, as she would be best equipped to understand what it takes to succeed in your field. If you’re starting out in the accounting field, you might find a mentor who runs an accounting practice. Finding someone who has had a career path similar to yours can help give you the direction and advice on how you can succeed.

Mentoring programs differ one to the next. Some are very formal and meet every week or so. Others are more organic. Maybe you exchange emails and have lunch once every few months. You get out of a mentoring program what you put in. Make it worth both your time and that of your mentor’s.
How to Find a Mentor


Some companies have formal mentor programs, designed to help you achieve specific goals. If your company doesn’t have such a program, create your own. At networking events, look for seasoned professionals who take an interest in you. Search LinkedIn for qualified professionals with similar interests, group affiliations, and career paths.

More info on finding a mentor and complete US News article

7 Keys to Landing Your Dream Job

By Matthew Setter

We all know it’s tough getting jobs these days. So here are seven tips that will help you nail your dream job:

1. Build a brand

When you’re applying for a job, you could be like so many others – BORING! You could have nothing interesting, innovative, novel or remarkable about you.
You could send in a CV in the same style, font, line-height, line-spacing as EVERYBODY ELSE. Now think for a second, what’s going to be remarkable and memorable about you? Answer: NOTHING!
Businesses spend hundreds, thousands, millions each year building a brand, so why don’t you? If you have no brand and aren’t sure where to start, ask yourself:

  • Am I on LinkedIn?
  • Do I have a personal website?
  • Do I have personal business cards?
  • Is my CV different?
    • Does it have extra polish?
    • Does it have sharp wording?
    • Does it have professional color?
  • Do I have a personal video introducing myself?

Tim Reid at the Small Business, Big Marketing Podcast gives a good introduction to this.

2. Turn up early

The surest way to not get the job is to be late or scrape in on time. If you can’t even turn up on time, then rightly or wrongly, this says a lot about you in the mind of the interviewer.
The sad thing is, a lot of very talented and capable people barely organize themselves and then wonder why they aren’t called back. Don’t be one of these people! Without wanting to flog a dead horse here:

  • Know where you need to be
  • Know who you are talking to
  • Have contact details handy – email, linkedIn, phone, fax and website
  • Check out the place on Google Maps so that it’s easier to find

But don’t be too early either. Being on time means being (no more than) 10 – 15 minutes early. That way you’re not hanging about and needing to be looked after, and you’re not cutting it so close that you’re filling out paperwork when you should be in the interview.

3. Preempt interview questions

When you interview for a role, it’s so important to articulate why you’re it, the bomb- shizzel, the top notch, top dog, the A1 with a bullet! So pre-empt questions that you might get asked and be prepared with answers that show why you’re the right person to hire.
Try what Greek businessman, Aristotle Onassis, used to do: he rehearsed in his mind (for hours if necessary), asking himself questions that would likely be asked and refining multiple answers until he nailed each and every one of them perfectly.
Don’t let yourself be surprised. Take the initiative and pre-empt!

4. Research the organization thoroughly

If you get the job, you’ll probably work there for 2+ years, 44 – 48 weeks a year, 5 days a week, 7 – 10 hours a day. So you should damn well know a TON about these people, what they do, who they are, when they kicked off, why they did so, what they’ve done recently, where they’re going and WHY!
This isn’t sucking up to the teacher and offering them an apple – this is YOUR career and your life. So take it seriously.
Not sure where to start? Here are a few helpful resources: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, Companies House (or the local companies register), plus the company’s website and press releases. The list goes on and on.

Keys 5 -7 and complete BrazenCareerist Article

10 Things Your Interviewer Won’t Tell You

By Alison Green | U.S.News & World Report LP


7. Fit really, really matters, so we think a lot about your personality. You might have all the qualifications an employer is looking for, but still not get hired because your working style would clash with the people with whom you’d be working. Remember, it’s not just a question of whether you have the skills to do the job; it’s also a question of fit for this particular position, with this particular boss, in this particular culture, and in this particular company.


2. We’re judging how you’re dressed and groomed. In most industries, a professional appearance still matters. You don’t need to wear expensive clothes, but showing up in a casual outfit or clothes that don’t fit properly, having unkempt hair, or inappropriately flashy makeup can harm your chances.



4. Little things count. Candidates often act as if only “official” contacts, like interviews and formal writing samples, count, but hiring managers are watching everything, including things like how quickly you respond to requests for writing samples and references, whether your email confirming the time of the interview is sloppily written, and how you treat the receptionist.


5. We might act like we don’t mind you bad mouthing a former employer, but we do. We’ll let you talk on once you start, but internally we’re noting that you’re willing to trash-talk people who have employed you in the past and are wondering if you’ll do that to us too. What’s more, we’re wondering about the other side of the story–whether you’re hard to get along with, or a troublemaker, or impossible to please.

Read complete article and all 10 things…

5 Top Company Perks That Attract Qualified Job Candidates

Best Employee Perks That Your Employees Want

The ultimate success of your business can hinge upon the quality of the candidates you recruit when hiring. Often, to get the best and brightest candidates to take positions within your business, you have to offer them something extra special. Some companies elect to offer these desirable and most qualified candidate salaries so high they can’t refuse. While this is an option, it isn’t always the best one. Instead of blowing your hiring budget by shelling out more cash than you should to secure those candidates, offer them other company and employee perks that will take less of a bite out of your budget.

  • Tuition Reimbursement – Offering your staff the opportunity to better themselves on your dime can be quite enticing to many would-be job takers. Giving your workers the opportunity to enroll in a degree-granting online education program while working for you will likely make them feel that you care about them as more than just workers, but instead as people. This in turn can result in a sense of loyalty, which can be good for both the employee and the business.
  • Flexible Scheduling – It can be difficult to balance work with the requirements of home life. By allowing your workers to largely set their own schedule, you can make this balancing act easier and likely attract workers. Though you may not be able to allow your staff complete liberty to come and go as they please, you can allow them the opportunity to set up four-day work weeks for themselves or let them pick their starting and stopping times. This employee workplace flexibility will likely pay off not only in improved employee morale, but also potentially in increased productivity as happy workers are often naturally more productive.
  • Ample Vacation – Regardless of how much the workers who make up your team love their jobs, there will be times when they tire of the daily grind and require a break. By giving your workers more vacation time than the norm, you can attract high-quality workers to join your ranks. Whether its PTO, vacation time, or a handful of floating holidays, time off is an effective employee recruitment and retention tool.  If you elect to offer a large amount of vacation time, make this known when recruiting candidates so they can consider it among other deciding factors when determining whether or not to take the job you offer.

Bouncing Back from Job Loss: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Job Hunters

by Margie Warrell

A friend recently shared with me how her husband fell into yearlong depression after he was laid off from his finance job during the global economic meltdown in late 2008. He’d worked hard all his life, thrived on the pressures and challenges of his work, and enjoyed the money he earned. Becoming unemployed for the first time in his life in his midforties was a huge kick in the gut, and one he didn’t cope with very well.

There’s no two ways about it: Losing your job is hard. Whether it has everything to do with your performance, or nothing at all, it’s still hard. However, if you look at job loss, like any setback from an enlarged perspective, you realize that success in life is measured far less by our opportunities than by how we respond to life’s setbacks and challenges.

The story of my friend’s husband one I’ve heard many times. The challenge people in that situation face is in how they handle not only the loss of their job, but the many emotions that it can arise. These range from a sense of humiliation, failure and vulnerability, to anxiety, resentment, and self-pity. Sure, losing your job can be a blow to your back pocket, but it’s often an even bigger blow to your ego and self worth.

Over the last few years millions of people have found themselves involuntarily out of work—too often through no fault of their own.  This year, many will again.   But whether the reason you lost your job has everything to do with your perceived performance, or absolutely nothing, it’s how you respond in the wake of it that will set you apart from others when it comes to finding a new job. When it comes to a successful job hunt, attitude is everything. A proactive and positive mindset will differentiate you from the masses, making all the difference in how “lucky” you get in an unlucky economy. It will even determine whether you one day look back on this time with some measure of gratitude for what you gained from it—whether it was the chance to re-evaluate your life, spend extra time with your family, teach your kids about budgeting, or to simply re-affirm what matters most.

Confucius said that our natures are alike (i.e. no one likes being sacked), it’s our habits are that separate us. Below are 7 habits to separate yourself from the pack, move your job application to the top of the pile, and land yourself not only back into a job, but perhaps an even better one than before.

1/Stay future-focused.

It’s easy to get stuck in the past and what shoulda-woulda-coulda happened, but didn’t. Doing so only perpetuates destructive emotions that fuel anger, self-pity and powerlessness. Focus on the future, and on what you need to do to set yourself up as well as possible on the job front,in how you are budgeting your money, and in your relationship with those who can help you find a new job. What you focus on expands, so focus on what you want, not on what you don’t.

2/ Don’t let your job status you.

Sure, losing your job is a very personal experience, but don’t take it too personally. Who you are is not what you do. Never was. Never will be. Research by psychologist Marty Seligman found that the biggest determinant between those who succeed after setbacks of any kind is how they interpret them. People who interpret losing their job as a sign of personal inadequacy or failure are less likely to ‘get back on the horse’ in their job hunt than those who interpret it as an unfortunate circumstance that provided a valuable opportunity to grow in self-awareness, re-evaluate priorities and build resilience. You get to define who you are, not your job or a company’s decision whether or not to employ you. Don’t take it as a personal rejection against you. It may well be due to economic forces far beyond your control that you found yourself out of a job. Potential employers will be more attracted to people who have proven their ability to stay positive and confident despite a setback/job loss.

3/ Prioritize self-care.

When you’ve lost your job it is all too easy plant yourself on the couch, remote in one hand, beer or bag of chips in the other, and wallow in self-pity. Many do! But mental and emotional resilience requires physical resilience. So be intentional about taking care of YOU and doing whatever it takes to feel strong and fit. (After all, you now have no excuse that you don’t have time for exercise!) Studies have found that exercise increases stress resilience – it produces neurons that are less responsive to stress hormones. Get outdoors, go for a run, do some gardening, or just do something that lifts your spirits – whether building your kids a cubby house or taking your dog to the beach – and helps to shift the negative emotions that have the potential to keep you from being proactive in your job hunt.

Tips 4-7 and Complete Forbes Article