The 5 Things You MUST Say in a Job Interview

by ComeRecommended

You always hear about what you shouldn’t say in an interview, but what should you say?What are those tid-bits you should mention that will set you apart from the rest?

Here are a few that I found incredibly helpful:

That You Actually Want the Position

This little tidbit could be the one thing that sets you apart from the other candidates. Don’t play it cool and aloof in this situation. If you are eager to be hired for the position, LET THEM KNOW. But remember to always be prepared to tell them why.

Your Familiarity with the Company

Expressing your familiarity with the company you are interviewing with is a great way to SHOW the employer how interested you are and how invested you will be in your job, without actually having to say exactly that.

Good Buzzwords

Whenever you are asked a question about yourself, like what skills do you possess, or do you think you are a team player, make sure to use your buzzwords. Collaborative, innovative, pro-active, drive, cooperate, team ethic, contribute…these are all great words to use. Come up with a few of your own that you feel really describe you, and make sure to use them in an interview.

Things 4,5, and the complete article

9 Employment Tips for Older Job Seekers

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Even before the Great Recession, a rising percent of retirement-age folks were still working. The economy was strong, consumers were spending like crazy and lots of jobs were, in physical terms at least, not taxing for older employees. Today, the percent of people over age 65 who are working or seeking work has reached new highs. But the reasons for the continued trend have changed drastically.

The economy and consumer spending have recovered slowly, and job growth has been anemic. Retirement plans have been deferred, if not destroyed, for millions of Americans. So, it’s either back to work, or if you’re lucky, keeping a solid job as long as you can. Retirement is still in the cards, perhaps. But for many, it now includes at least part-time work until age 70.

Still, these largely negative factors are driving lots of positive changes that will help older Americans fashion solid work-retirement plans. For the past few years, a foundation-funded initiative called Tapping Mature Talent worked with the U.S. Department of Labor. The effort produced 10 demonstration sites across the country to help develop successful ways to find, train and employ older workers. Even though the project started at the same time as the economic downturn, the sites achieved a 50 percent job placement rate, on average.

During the initiative from 2009 to 2012, people at the locations tried different approaches, and some best practices emerged from these efforts, according to Amy Sherman, an associate vice president at the Council for Adult & Experiential Learning, a Chicago-based nonprofit that provided assistance to the sites. Here are some of the program’s most helpful findings:

1. Get credit for what you know. Many older job seekers have rich personal experiences that would make them qualified to succeed at jobs, she says. But often, this knowledge does not translate into the more formal work experiences employers are seeking. Enrolling in a certification program or seeking college credit for such experience can develop the third-party credentials that would lead to a job. CAEL has built a college credit predictor tool that can help translate experience into college-credit equivalents.

2. You are a brand. Aggressive personal promotion has become a standard employment technique. Yet many older people are uncomfortable tooting their own horn, and may not know how to use the social media tools that can be megaphones for job seekers. “It’s almost like learning how to be a salesperson for yourself and of branding yourself,” Sherman says. “This is really challenging.”

3. Career navigators. Today’s workplace can be daunting, particularly for someone who’s been out of the workforce for only a few years. Specific job skills, particularly involving computers, may need to be relearned. Job-search and interviewing techniques have also been transformed by the Internet, and the explosion of social media sites. Having a “go-to” point person to coordinate job placement services has proven helpful.


4. Offer your services. Unpaid internships can be a great way to get your foot in the door of an industry or employer you like. You get experience, an addition to your résumé and knowledge of how to improve your skills.

Tips 5-9 and the complete USNews article

5 Things You Must Do Before Applying For A Job

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Never apply for a job without making sure your online presence is as ready to interview as you are. Employers will look at the online version of you before they invite the in-person version to an interview, so make sure what they see helps solidify their impression of you as a candidate. Here are five things you must do before applying for a job:

1. Update Your LinkedIn Profile

If you haven’t revised your LinkedIn profile since your last job, it’s time to make some updates. Rewrite your summary to include your current career objective, and ask colleagues to endorse you and provide recommendations that reflect your job search. Make sure your online resume includes all your newest accomplishments. If you don’t have a professional picture to add to your profile, it’s time to have one taken.

2. Update Your Social Media Profiles

It’s easy to forget to keep your social media profiles updated, especially when you have multiple accounts. Log on to each of your social media services and make sure your profile photo is current and flattering and your profile blurb is accurate. See if you can make your profiles subtly reflect your professional skills without reading like a job application; “I see your copy errors” is a good line for a Facebook profile, while “I have six years of copy editing experience and am looking for work” is too much.
While you’re at it, untag those unflattering or unwanted pics, and delete any posts or tweets that don’t reflect well on you or your candidacy.

3. Google Yourself

You know your potential employer is going to Google you, so go ahead and Google yourself first.
Ideally, your top results are reflections of your work and personality: they should include any articles or print media about your work at previous organizations as well as links to your LinkedIn, Facebook, and other accounts. If you have a professional blog, it should be within the first five links as well and clearly identifiable as your work.

If your Google search turns up negative results, consider a service like Reputation Changer. This service removes negative references and past mistakes on the Internet, leaving your online presence more reflective of your current skills and abilities.

Things 4,5, and the complete Careerealism.com Article

5 helpful Twitter job search tips

By Amy Levin-Epstein

In a highly competitive job market like this one, those seeking work will spend time revising their resumes and cover letters and money on new suits and commuting to interviews. But Twitter costs you nothing, and it’s only as time consuming as you make it. Here are five smart ways to tweet up a new job.

Become an online ‘brand’
Now you don’t have to bill yourself as the next Oprah of your industry to get a new job. If you don’t have the experience to back it up, such bravado can be off-putting. But everything from the language to the content of your tweets should reflect your interests, knowledge and personality. “Before you are even interviewed, you can demonstrate how much you know,” says Kenneth Wisnefski, a social media consultant and CEO Of WebiMax.

Add value
Retweet where appropriate. Join a chat. Respond to leading questions. Twitter is a conversation, and to be effective, you have to join in. “We have hired people who consistently retweeted our tweets and added additional value to topics or discussions we have been engaged in,” notes Wisnefski. 

Ask questions
Sometimes, the best way to start a conversation with the company is to ask your own leading questions. If it’s a smaller company, this may be especially effective. Your query may be a smart, open-ended question about your industry or a more direct request for an informational interview. You’ll have to use your best judgment here, taking into consideration the industry and company. For some specific Twitter templates, read this. 

Tips 4,5, and the complete MoneyWatch article

Top 6 Tips To Kick Start Your Career

Author:

I recently had the chance to sit in on an Early Talent Career Development Panel during SAP’s People & Diversity Week, which is a week-long offering of events and workshops focused on career development, health and diversity celebration.

Not only was the session a huge success, with over 80 in-person and virtual employees attending, but more importantly the speakers were all very passionate about supporting employees with their career development and offered lots of valuable and insightful advice. I was so fortunate to be able to attend and listen in on their career stories and tips.

While the session was promoted as an early talent event, the career advice and best practices shared throughout were extremely useful for seasoned employees as well. Here are the top 6 tips I took away from the session!

Tip #1: Be Ready
Always be ready to take on that next opportunity. Have courage and don’t be afraid to fail because you never know where it will take you.

Tip #2: Build Your Brand
Create yourself as an expert in whatever you do. Make it visible to the right people through your work and networking. Know who you are and what you do, your dreams and aspirations, and connect with people who can help you or work with you to get to where you want to be.

Tip #4: Know Your Passions
Think back to your past projects, what did you love the most and what were the things you know you never want to work on again? Reflect on your work and look for trends about your skill sets, preferred work environment, etc., to guide your career direction and development.

Hiring manager offers tips to ace job interview

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Dana Manciagli has seen it all. In her more than 30 years as a hiring manager for multinational companies, including Microsoft, IBM, Kodak and Avery Dennison, Manciagli has interviewed, hired and coached thousands of people globally.

Her new book, “Cut the Crap, Get a Job! A New Job Search Guide for a New Era,” is packed with new ideas and tactics all given from the perspective of a seasoned insider who knows exactly what it takes to get hired.

Here are Manciagli’s tips job seekers need to know.

Mistake: Arriving late to the interview. The hiring manager thinks you have time-management issues.
Solution: Always arrive and be in the lobby 30 minutes early.

Mistake: Dressing too informally or inappropriately. The hiring manager thinks this interview is not that important to you.
Solution: Have one interview outfit and use it.

Mistake: Babbling on and on. The hiring manager thinks you’re unprepared and not self-aware.
Solution: Slow down and breathe. When asked a question, pause, take a deep breath and respond thoughtfully.

Mistake: Answering the wrong question. The hiring manager thinks you’re not listening.
Solution: Really listen and be present in an interview. Don’t just blurt out all the things you want to talk about.

More Tips and the complete SF Examiner article