LinkedIn is Not the Ultimate Recruiting Site, Twitter is

Twitter serves myriad purposes for millions of people. It’s provided space for brand campaigns, event organizations, personal rants, and every other attention-seeking tactic imaginable since 2006. Though many people use it for professional connections, some view it unprofessional at times — certainly not as “respectable” as LinkedIn for branding.

So what makes Twitter such a uniquely useful resource for job seekers (and posters)?

What Twitter has that LinkedIn doesn’t:

The most obvious advantage Twitter holds over LinkedIn is its massive number of constantly active users. Although LinkedIn is currently the top social network favored by recruiters, most of its users are passive candidates, 60% of whom don’t log in more than once a day. (The only two job offers I’ve ever gotten on LinkedIn came from headhunters outside my desired career field, while I was already happily employed.)

Active tweeters, by contrast, are much more likely to be “always on,” ready to catch the latest news. If LinkedIn is a library, Twitter is Grand Central Station at rush hour. This makes it easier for tweeters to get lost in the shuffle, but it also means they have a huge potential audience.

Because so many more people are likely to tweet frequently (and without a brain-to-fingers filter) than to update their LinkedIn statuses, Twitter is a better place for building a brand voice. With the famous 140-character limit, you get very good at expressing your viewpoint concisely, making your account easier to differentiate from others.

Recruiters want to know what kind of personality they’re dealing with when they consider someone for a position. LinkedIn may tell them what you can do, but Twitter will tell them who you are. (Note: this only works if you tweet like you talk in real life. If your online persona is spicy and fearless, but you have trouble meeting people’s eyes in face-to-face conversation, the dishonesty of your Twitter voice will only hurt you in your job search.)

Not only do your tweets accomplish this; your bio is another important resource. Bios are one of the first things people check when they consider following someone new, so there’s no excuse not to make yours awesome. People tend to be more creative with their Twitter bios than they are with their “career objective” lines on LinkedIn. Which one do you think tells recruiters more of what they want to know?

It’s easier to follow people who interest you on Twitter than it is on LinkedIn, because each social network has its own unspoken protocol. Part of Twitter is the understanding that random follows and unfollows just come with the territory. Sending a “connect” request on LinkedIn is a slightly more loaded act if you don’t already know the person (or have a mutual connection). The recipient of your invitation may wonder what you want from him if he’s never even heard of you before. Plus, Twitter doesn’t notify people when you view their profiles, like LinkedIn does, so that minor awkward factor is gone.

How you can optimize your profile to get a job:  find out how to optimize and the complete UndercoverRecruiter article

Seven ways to tell if your job interview went well

by Lee Boyce

You step out of the job interview, take a deep breath and relax on your journey home after what can be a hugely stressful experience – especially if you really, really want the role.

But then the worry quickly beds in. Did I say the right things? Was the potential employer impressed? Should I chase up the recruitment agent or HR after not hearing anything after a few hours?

It can be hard to gauge just how well an interview has gone – and not much you can do to influence the employer once you step out of the interview.

As part of our Interview Cheat Series, we explore the key signals that show the interview has gone well.

4. Were future projects mentioned?

How can you tell if your working relationship has a future? The interviewer would probably mention to you where it’s going.

If they talked about how they would use your expertise into their future projects, plans, and developments and brought in other members of the team to discuss, it is likely you are a top contender for the role.

Not only does it show that they can see you adding value by working there, it also means you made a good enough impression to actually last, according to Reed.

5. Did you meet the team?

An invitation to meet the team is essentially a colleague trial run to show if you would fit in well with the characters already bedded into the firm.

It also means you have probably impressed in the interview and the recruiter is keen to see how you interact with the team before they make a final decision.

The advice here is to to keep impressing by staying polite and friendly with everyone you meet.

It is also the perfect opportunity for you to get a feel of the working environment.

Something as simple as a tour of the office or a chat with your potential colleagues can often be enough to figure out if a workplace is really right for you – and again shows the interviewer is probably keen for you to start.