These Former Googlers Created An AI Tool To Improve Crappy Resume Writing

By Lydia Dishman

“Resumes suck,” declares Richard Liu, cofounder and CEO of  Leap.ai. So Liu, Google’s former head of engineering at Project Fi, set out to fix it with fellow Google vet Yunkai Zhou.

Your resume is essential to your job hunt, but recruiters and hiring managers spend as little as six seconds scanning it to decide if you’ll get an interview.

No wonder there is a surfeit of advice on gaming resumes to stand out–whether you concentrate on the part recruiters tend to look at first, trim it to the perfect, readable length, and upgrade it for maximum impact.

Liu says that part of the problem lies in the job search itself. The resume is a vehicle for a job seeker who’s actively scanning multiple openings and is usually tailoring their resume to suit whatever the job description requires. With the help of AI, he contends, it’s possible to create both a more intelligent resume for recruiters to use and more intelligent job search for the applicant.

Read the full Fast Company article

It’s possible to be both content with your job and ready to move on

 Marco Buscaglia, Tribune Content Agency

The job search has become a full-time reality for most people. Even those with fulfilling, lucrative work feel like they have to be on the lookout for the next big thing. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Bottom line: If you like your job, keep it.

“That doesn’t mean that you, in terms of keeping yourself attractive to other employers, ‘let yourself go,'” says Bonnie Nylek, a career coach in Morristown, N.J. “But you don’t need to feel like you have to be on a continual job search. Give yourself a break and enjoy the job you have. And be an active participant in keeping your credentials and contacts current. That’s not actively looking for a job, that’s just being a realist.”

Still, there’s always that looming wrecking ball just around the corner. “That’s the fear for most people,” says Nylek. “Things may be going exceptionally well, but that doesn’t mean a round of layoffs won’t be coming next week. That’s why they overstress about work at times and may make a move to a new job because of unconfirmed worries about their current position.”

Stress-free strategies

There is a happy medium, says Deborah Brown-Volkman, career coach and president of Surpass Your Dreams in East Moriches, N.Y. She offers these tips to help you remain gainfully employed.

1. Be confident about the future: Call it what you want, but if you tell yourself something bad will happen to your job, it just might. Instead of dwelling on the “what if” scenarios, focus on an “I’m OK” philosophy. Your employer may change, but tell yourself you will always be employed and reality will likely follow suit, she says.

See strategies 2-5 and the complete article