Want a new job in 2018 but don’t have time to find one? Seven top tips on how to search for a fresh role when you’re already employed

By Lee Boyce for Thisismoney.co.uk

A new year signals the potential for a fresh start – and top of the list for many is ditching the current job and finding an exciting opportunity elsewhere.

Perhaps the current role has become stale, you don’t like your boss or maybe it is time simply for a new challenge in 2018 – or a combination of all three.

Job seeking can be tough, especially when you already have a job. David Whitby, careers specialist at Glassdoor UK has given us seven top tips to make sure your employment search doesn’t become a second full-time stressful job.

As part of This is Money’s interview cheat sheet series, David gives potential job seekers all the advice they need to help next year become the one in which you secure a new role.

He says: ‘The last thing you want to do when you get back from a long day at work is plonk down at your laptop to spend hours fine-tuning your CV, cranking out job applications and crafting tailored cover letters.

‘Often, either your work performance suffers or your motivation to find a new position does.

That’s not even to mention the logistical nightmare of scheduling phone screens, in-person interviews and presentations when you work a full nine-to-five.

‘But finding a new job doesn’t have to feel like a full-time job. With a few adjustments to your process and habits, it’s entirely possible to avoid burnout – or getting caught by your current boss.’

Here are his tips:

7. TAKE YOUR WORK ENTHUSIASM UP A GEAR

It may seem a strange thing to do, but try to appear even more enthusiastic and satisfied at work than normal.

If you are down about your current job, most people have trouble hiding it and give off an ‘I’ve had enough’ vibe.

This can lead to unwanted attention and might mean you get caught out. Throw your colleagues off the scent by appearing to be content.

At the very least, it will trick your mind into a temporary state of engagement with work.

See tips 1-6 and the complete article