Sunday, March 10, 2019

Why Personal Branding Is Essential For Getting A Job

This post was written by Pamela Paterson

What’s A Personal Brand?

According to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, “Your brand is what people say about you when you’re not in the room.”  They are the words that are invoked when people think of you—your skills, values, and talents. Your brand is what people can expect from you.

For example, I gave a lecture recently about personal brands to college students. I asked them to give me words that described their professors. Some said hardworking, quality, and committed. Others said disengaged, unprofessional, and unfriendly. I pointed out that all of their professors were qualified on paper, but some of them didn’t spend any effort to create a positive brand. If you lack tenure and are just entering the job market, you need to create a strong brand that tells employers why to hire you.

Developing Your Brand

Your brand will tell employers why you are a perfect fit for the job and their company: how you meet their needs. Your brand must be evident in your resume and cover letter, as well as your online presence (when you Google yourself, what do you find?). Your brand must match the requirements in the company’s job posting, as well as the company values that you find on their website. As an aside, matching the job posting will also help you get through the company’s applicant tracking system, which is designed to screen out poor keyword matches.

Through the job posting and website, and any other online searching you do (for example, of staff LinkedIn profiles), you’ll learn some general characteristics the company looks for in its employees.  It could be people who can work in an aggressive, multiple-priority environment, or people who function best in a process-driven government organization. You’ll learn about the “personality” of the company. The closer your brand is to their personality, the better your chances of joining that company.

Know that even companies in the same industry may have different personalities. For example, two accounting firms will not necessarily embrace the same values. A small, local accounting firm that helps clients file their taxes will have a stronger requirement for customer service than an auditor in a global accounting firm who doesn’t have any direct customer contact.

Strengthening Your Brand - Read the rest of the WorkItDaily article

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

CV Writing Tips: 8 Common Mistakes You Need To Avoid

By

When it’s time for your job search to commence, reviewing your CV and checking CV writing tips should be at the top of your list.

We all know that it is important to have a properly-formatted and up-to-date CV. However, while we focus our efforts on ensuring our CV looks great to potential employers, it is easy to overlook simple mistakes that could actually be quite damaging to your application. Once you have sent your CV off, this damage is irreversible.

Some mistakes are minor grammatical errors and some are just extremely awkward!

1. Check and double check spelling and grammar

This is the number 1 most common mistake made on CVs, it happens a lot! It is also one of the easiest mistakes to avoid, so there is no excuse!

Poor spelling and grammar tells an employer that you have poor attention to detail and suggests that you may not care too much about the opportunity. To avoid this, rather than just relying on a computer to check your mistakes (computers are not very good in the grammar department), get at least one friend or family member to carefully read through your CV and check for mistakes. They should be able to spot any that you have missed.

2. Avoid long sentences that say nothing at all

Your CV should be concise and direct. Employers do not need a lengthy explanation about everything you have ever done, you can go into more detail at your interview. Try to use concise bullet points instead of paragraphs that will highlight key achievements and skills that are relevant to the role that you are applying for.

3. Always tailor your CV

Remember that every opportunity is different, so using the same generic CV is unlikely to work if you are applying for numerous roles. Consider the role requirements listed in the job advert and make small changes to your CV to show that you match all of these requirements. An employer will then clearly see that you have taken the time to understand the role and know exactly what is required of you.

See all 8 common mistakes and the complete Career Experts article





Monday, February 4, 2019

How To Get A Summer Internship In 8 (Pretty) Easy Steps

Sabrina Rojas Weiss

There are so many more tempting alternatives to working in an internship over the summer. You could be backpacking through another continent or partying on the beach. You could be earning more money as a nanny, or hanging on to your childhood as a camp counselor. But if you've clicked on this story, you know that those probably aren't the smartest, most responsible ways to spend the summer months as you look toward building a future career.
 
While there's no guarantee that you'll be offered a sweet job immediately after completing an internship, it's a pretty reliable way to get there eventually. For one, you'll be building up a résumé with more than just retail and babysitting jobs. You'll also be meeting people in the industry you've set your sights on, and those will become part of the network that you'll need to find work later.
 
"The biggest issue with applying for a job on a job board is that there are hundreds of other people also applying for those same jobs," career coach Elana Konstant tells Refinery29, reminding everyone why networking is the key to everything.
 
Another benefit of internships no one talks about: This is a great way to determine if the career you think you want is really right for you. Maybe you actually wind up hating it. Or you might discover that there's a specific path within that industry that you want to pursue.
So how do you go about landing the summer internship that will launch your future? You could park yourself in front of the computer and apply to every opening you find. Or you could work a little smarter. Here's how:
 
#1
Start early (but it's never too late)

"Some industries recruit [interns] almost a full year in advance of the summer," says A-J Aronstein, associate dean of Beyond Barnard, Barnard College's career-development office. Financial services, consulting, and tech companies tend to be the ones with that early timeline, especially because some of them actually do hire directly from their intern pool. But many other industries and smaller companies without rigid internship programs don't hire until spring, so don't panic if you get a late start.

#5
Be open to smaller companies

As you're searching on LinkedIn, you can also see where people who work at your dream company wind up working next. Some go on to smaller companies or less well-known organizations that could have opportunities for you. While you may think you need a big, famous brand on your résumé, those don't necessarily make for the best internship experiences if you'll just be getting coffee and doing data entry.

"The best internship, regardless of the size of a company, is one where you're actually learning real things that will help you be the best professional you can possibly be down the road," says Porter Braswell, CEO of the career platform Jopwell and author of the book Let Them See You: The Guide for Leveraging Your Diversity at Work. When you network with other employees and at your interview for the internship, try to get a sense of what kind of work they'll be asking of you and whether you'll receive guidance and mentorship along the way.


See all 8 Tips and the complete Refinery29 article

Monday, January 21, 2019

Where to Look for Jobs in 2019

Hiring will be up in both cities and career fields that are popular with older Americans





The ManpowerGroup, a firm that studies job trends, conducted more than 12,500 interviews with employers in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan regions. Participants were asked about whether they expected to hire workers during January through March 2019, compared with the last three months of 2018. Their responses revealed the “strongest hiring intentions in 12 years,” the report says.

"Increased employer optimism tells us employers have jobs to fill, yet we know they are struggling to find the talent they need — from production line workers to IT professionals,” says Becky Frankiewicz, president of ManpowerGroup North America. “With so many U.S. organizations set to hire in an already tight labor market, skilled workers can call the shots.” 

While the report states that hiring will be strong across the country — 23 percent of employers expect to grow their workforce — jobs could be especially abundant in the Sunshine State. Several cities in Florida top the report’s list for the biggest anticipated increases in hiring over the first three months of 2019. The top 10 cities (including a few extras due to ties) are:
1.    Daytona, Fla.
2.    Cape Coral, Fla.
3.    Tampa, Fla.
4.    Jacksonville, Fla.; Raleigh, N.C.
5.    Boise, Idaho

See the rest of the top 10 cities plus the full AARP article