20 Top Recruiting Experts and Job Gurus to Follow on Twitter Now

Social media provides more than a window of entertainment and breaking news — it can open up doors into the world of job recruitment and career experts. Twitter is a popular platform where experts of all kinds take 140 characters to publish information and advice on all things job search. Even better? You can get some insight into everything from how to up your game on social media to job openings.

Below, we highlight some of our favorite follows (which was difficult to narrow down!). From tweeting the best articles in industry news to tips on job openings, we’ve got you covered in all sorts of industries:

Resume and LinkedIn help, follow @AvidCareerist.

General career advice and job openings, follow @dailymuse.

Workplace trends and startups, follow @DanSchawbel.
Recruitment and career tips for all ages, follow @UndercoverRec.
Job-hunting tips and tricks, follow @GetSwitch.
Job Search Tips and Strategy @JobSearchJedi

Life Beyond LinkedIn – 5 Tips For Using Twitter For Your Job Search

Kym Matthews

I can already hear you asking the question. Twitter?  Who uses Twitter to job search?  Admittedly, I used to think the same thing.  I historically reserved my Twitter use to tweeting to TV shows (only to be disappointed when my witty repartee never made the screen). But, I was wrong. Twitter is much more and so here’s five tips that will help you to get the most out of your Twitter job hunt:

1) Jazz up your profile

Your Twitter profile is your personal brand, so make it engaging. Create a Twitter bio and add a profile image that conveys your personality and career goals. Use hashtags appropriate to your desired profession. Remember, your Twitter profile isn’t usually purely professional. Twitter is a great way to showcase your personality and talk to others about your interests.

2) Network  and communicate

Firstly, create a list of target companies to home in on relevant content. You can set your list to public or private, and add as many users to it as you like.  To build lists, search a name or username, select the gear icon next to their info and select ”Add or Remove From List”. Clicking on a list gives you a timeline of tweets from just those individuals and companies.

From here, follow the industries and companies you’re interested in, and take part in communities you care about. You may also want to follow recruiters, potential managers and colleagues, publications, job forums and industry leaders.  This way, you can initiate discussions with people who inspire you and find job opportunities at specific companies.

4) Use search tools

You can use Twitter’s built-in search bar for job openings: Type in a location, “hiring” and seniority level (such as “manager or “director”), and you’ll likely see tweets about open positions in your field.

Alternatively, job search engines such as Twitjobseek  allow you to search for jobs posted on Twitter using keywords – for example, software engineer in Sydney, NSW. From here, you can click on a link to find a job’s application page. Take a look at the Twitter users who are most frequently posting these listings; they might be worth following.

See all 5 tips and the complete Telstra Exchange article

 

How To Use Facebook and Twitter To Find Work

Vanessa McGrady

Chryselle D’Silva Dias, a freelance writer for publications such as Time, The Atlantic, BBC, Marie Claire India and the Guardian, to name a few, admits to being an early technology adopter, and that includes social media. What’s she’s found, by following the right people and publications, is that Twitter and Facebook are full of job opportunities. “In recent months, the bulk of my new work has come from Facebook groups for writers. From Twitter, I have found a few calls for pitches and story ideas, which is always useful.”

Though Dias, 42, has a very specific kind of work she does from her home base of Goa, India, her method for getting gigs can apply to nearly anyone, anywhere, in any industry.

Using the right tools

Dias uses Tweetdeck to manage her Twitter account. Other platforms for organizing the influx of information include Hootsuite and Social Oomph. “Many people find Twitter overwhelming because it appears as one constant stream of news and comments and responses from other people. An app like Tweetdeck helps you break your feed into smaller, manageable chunks.” You can set up a list or that shows you only tweets from specific people, or that mention a word or phrase. Dias, for example, has her feed organized so she can readily see tweets for editors, feminist writers and jobs. She also tracks search terms such as “is hiring writers” and “call for pitches.” So if you’re in the hotel industry for example, you might look for tweets that mention “hospitality” and “hiring” and follow hotel chains that interest you.

Understanding the etiquette

Dias likens Twitter to being at a party, where you know some people, but not everyone. “You should be friendly, polite and not push (only) your work constantly. Be curious about other people, their work and what they’re discussing. Jump in if you have something to say and not because you want them to notice you.” She says that over time, followers will come to understand your voice and the kinds of things you post.

And, like in any other medium—snail mail or real life—follow the instructions. If you’re asked to reply via a link to a website, do exactly that—don’t just reply with a Facebook message linking to your resume, and don’t worry too much if you feel ignored. “Don’t take things personally – the people behind the account probably have a lot to handle (they’re likely to be inundated, it is a call for work) and they might not respond to you or respond in a way that you’re not happy about.”

Finally, Dias offers these tips for a more successful job search:  See the tips and the complete Forbes article

Top 23 Twitter Tips for Job Seekers

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One best resource which is perfect for your job search is twitter. Twitter gets you linked with new people, organization, jobs, courses and ideas. This online tool can be used in the right manner so that your online brand is improved and you stand on top of the search results. Apart from other social networking sites, twitter is your entry way to expand your network. Being an open network twitter is a perfect platform to get you linked with other professionals. Let’s run through a few twitter tips for job seekers.

3. Username for twitter: The username used for twitter must be unique and so pick the one that supports your job search. The username can be altered later. In the retweet usernames are the ones which are included and hence making use of descriptive, short and memorable ones are vital. Descriptions can be aspects that you do professionally and your name would be what you mention. Using real name for twitter account can be helpful in recognizing. For adding a username, 15 characters can be used in twitter excluding @ along with any mix of upper and lower case.

8. Tweets related to brand: Professional and job seekers should bear in mind to have a quality history of tweets and tweet something related to profession. Make a habit of updating yourself with blogs, news and latest updates in the industry and tweet accordingly.

12. Making use of third party application (API): A third party application can be used by users who find twitter to be baffling and disorganized. Seismic.com, hootsuite.com, tweetdeck.com are few API’s which assists in organizing tweets according to the columns as desired such as reference name, ones consisting hashtag or keywords and listing of followers ones are interested in.

See all 23 tips and the complete WiseStep article

Twitter Is The Best Job Search Tool You’re Not Using – Here’s How You Can

Sarah Alvarez got her first job after tweeting about Nutella.

She was studying abroad in France in 2012 when she saw that Shout PR, a retail and lifestyle marketing firm, had blogged and tweeted about a healthier alternative to the beloved hazelnut spread. Alvarez tweeted about the article and thanked the firm for posting it, and she later mentioned that Twitter conversation when she emailed the company about summer internships.

Shout had her come for an interview two days after she got back to the U.S. — and it hired her as an intern.

“Because of the way I reached out, they took a look at my social media profile,” said Alvarez, now an account executive at the communications agency Bite. “I interviewed with the person who had written the blog post, and she was very excited that I’d been engaging with her content.”

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the barrage of Twitter noise — and to favor LinkedIn instead as a professional social media tool. But if you don’t look closely at Twitter, you could be missing out on some crucial job and networking opportunities.

Twitter offers a strong network of people in various fields, and companies and hiring managers are increasingly sharing open positions on their accounts.

“It offers less structure as a job search tool, but more opportunities to connect with people,” said Pamela Skillings, an interview coach and founder of Big Interview, a job coaching program. “You can stumble on an opportunity that you might not otherwise find.”

Here are some tips to get the most out of your Twitter job hunt:

1) Spruce up your profile

First, think of your Twitter profile as your brand: Include an identifiable photo, so recruiters recognize who you are.

And don’t underestimate that bio under your picture. “Your bio is your elevator pitch,” said Alyson Weiss, a social media coach. “It’s your first chance to make an impression before people decide to click on you.”

In addition, Skillings recommends including your Twitter handle on your resume. “You’re giving people the ability to find you, and it shows a level of transparency.”

4) Use search tools

You can use Twitter’s built-in search bar for job openings: Type in a location, “hiring” and seniority level (like “entry level” or “director”), and you’ll likely see tweets about open positions in your desired area.

There are also job search engines specifically for Twitter, like Tweetmyjobs.com, which allows users to add in filters by location, industry and keyword.

Hiring managers are more frequently combing Twitter for applicants, particularly in fields where social media acumen might be considered a qualification for a job, like in HR and communications. Other industries — like nonprofits and academia — are starting to boost their Twitter presence too, Skillings said.

Charlie Loyd, who creates cloudless satellite imagery at Mapbox, found his job after tweeting at five mapping companies and including a link to his portfolio. Mapbox responded in three minutes.

“I was frustrated, and I wanted to get this in front of someone,” Loyd said. “And there was no formal submission process for, ‘Hey, I’m doing work that you haven’t done before.'”

See all 4 tips and the complete HuffingtonPost article

Twitter Is The Best Job Search Tool You’re Not Using — Here’s How You Can

 

Sarah Alvarez got her first job after tweeting about Nutella.

She was studying abroad in France in 2012 when she saw that Shout PR, a retail and lifestyle marketing firm, had blogged and tweeted about a healthier alternative to the beloved hazelnut spread. Alvarez tweeted about the article and thanked the firm for posting it, and she later mentioned that Twitter conversation when she emailed the company about summer internships.

Shout had her come for an interview two days after she got back to the U.S. — and it hired her as an intern.

“Because of the way I reached out, they took a look at my social media profile,” said Alvarez, now an account executive at the communications agency Bite. “I interviewed with the person who had written the blog post, and she was very excited that I’d been engaging with her content.”

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the barrage of Twitter noise — and to favor LinkedIn instead as a professional social media tool. But if you don’t look closely at Twitter, you could be missing out on some crucial job and networking opportunities.

Twitter offers a strong network of people in various fields, and companies and hiring managers are increasingly sharing open positions on their accounts.

“It offers less structure as a job search tool, but more opportunities to connect with people,” said Pamela Skillings, an interview coach and founder of Big Interview, a job coaching program. “You can stumble on an opportunity that you might not otherwise find.”

Here are some tips to get the most out of your Twitter job hunt:

1) Spruce up your profile

First, think of your Twitter profile as your brand: Include an identifiable photo, so recruiters recognize who you are.

And don’t underestimate that bio under your picture. “Your bio is your elevator pitch,” said Alyson Weiss, a social media coach. “It’s your first chance to make an impression before people decide to click on you.”

In addition, Skillings recommends including your Twitter handle on your resume. “You’re giving people the ability to find you, and it shows a level of transparency.”

3) Make lists to narrow in on interesting companies

One way to sort through Twitter is to create a list for target companies, Weiss suggests.

“It’s overwhelming with so much content, since you turn around for a second and you have 200 missed tweets,” she said. “With a list, you can see job opportunities from specific companies.”

You can set your list to public or private, and add as many users to it as you like. Clicking on a list gives you a timeline of tweets from just those individuals and companies.

See all 5 tips and the complete HuffingtonPost article