Google launches its AI-powered jobs search engine

Looking for a new job is getting easier. Google today launched a new jobs search feature right on its search result pages that lets you search for jobs across virtually all of the major online job boards like LinkedIn, Monster, WayUp, DirectEmployers, CareerBuilder and Facebook and others. Google will also include job listings its finds on a company’s homepage.

The idea here is to give job seekers an easy way to see which jobs are available without having to go to multiple sites only to find duplicate postings and lots of irrelevant jobs.

With this new feature, is now available in English on desktop and mobile, all you have to type in is a query like “jobs near me,” “writing jobs” or something along those lines and the search result page will show you the new job search widget that lets you see a broad range of jobs. From there, you can further refine your query to only include full-time positions, for example. When you click through to get more information about a specific job, you also get to see Glassdoor and Indeed ratings for a company.  Read the full Tech Crunch article for more info.

Good at Texting? It Might Land You a Job

By Kelsey Gee

Struggling to get candidates to pick up the phone, employers try text messages for early-stage interviews

Your next job interview might happen via text message. Srsly.

Claiming that prospective hires are too slow to pick up the phone or respond to emails, employers are trying out apps that allow them to screen candidates and conduct early-stage interviews with texts.

“People don’t want to have that ten-minute [phone] conversation any more if they could just reply with a quick text,” said Kirby Cuniffe, chief executive of staffing firm Aegis Worldwide LLC. After Aegis recruiters reported that fewer potential hires were answering their phones, the firm decided to try texting. Since March, Indianapolis-based Aegis and Priceline Group ’s restaurant-booking service OpenTable have been using Canvas, a messaging app from Canvas Talent Inc. for text-based job interviews.

The app suggests interview questions employers can use, such as: “What motivates you?”

Its software analyzes candidates’ responses. Interviewers can rate answers with a thumbs-up or thumbs-down visible only to the employer and share transcripts of those text exchanges with co-workers.

Canvas charges employers around $300 per recruiter, and competes with similar apps such as Monster Worldwide Inc.’s Jobr.

The use of smartphone-based tools for job interviews shows how employers are trying to adapt to young workers’ communication habits. Some 12% of millennials—defined as those born between 1980 and the early 2000s—prefer the phone for business communication, according to a 2016 report on internet trends from venture-capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. By contrast, 45% prefer chatting online or exchanging messages by email or text.

Read the rest of the WSJ.com article

16 Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Job Search

Haven’t Interviewed for a Job Lately? 10 Tips to Help You Prepare

Some people go years without interviewing for a new job simply because they have been happy with their current employment. Others haven’t interviewed lately because they might have been self-employed. Whatever the reason, not interviewing for a job in quite some time can affect how you handle yourself in an interview. You want to make sure you do everything right and say the right things when interviewing for Big Sky jobs.

To get you headed in the right direction, we have compiled a list of 10 tips to help you prepare for your job interview:

  1. Prepare Ahead of Time – One of the most important things you must do prior to a job interview is to prepare ahead of time. If you fail to prepare it will show in your answers and body language during the interview.
  2. Put an Emphasis on Your Good Qualities – Make sure you emphasize your good qualities during the interview. There is nothing wrong with self-promotion during a job interview. In fact, it is the only way you will get across your qualities.
  3. Ask Questions – Do not be afraid to ask questions. In fact, it is a vital part of the job interview. The interviewer should not be the only person asking questions during the job interview. When you ask questions it shows the interviewer how invested you are in the job and the company.

See all 10 Tips and the complete article

7 Ways to Hack Your Job Search

By @TheHiredGuns

Your resume is polished. You’ve been networking like mad. Your interview suit is even pressed and ready to go at a moment’s notice. You’re also completely and totally exhausted. The job search is draining, and doing it right feels like a full-time gig. So why not hack your job search with these seven tips?

2. See Who Viewed Your LinkedIn Profile While Remaining Anonymous
One of the most frustrating parts of the LinkedIn experience is the privacy trade-off. If you want to browse profiles anonymously, you don’t get to see who viewed your own profile. Fortunately, there’s a sneaky way around that. Grab the LinkedIn app (if you haven’t already) and follow these instructions, courtesy of FullContact‘s Matt Hubbard:

1. Tap the blue “in” logo on the top left of the app’s home screen. You’ll see a few shortcuts, including Home, your profile, and others.

2. Find and tap the + Add Shortcut option at the bottom of this list.

3. Then select Who’s Viewed Your Profile on LinkedIn.

This enables you to research anonymously but still see who is viewing you – provided that they haven’t gone stealth also.

7. Manage Your Applications and Interviews Like a Pro
Keeping track of your applications, interviews, and follow-ups is a full-time job. Ditch the spreadsheet and start using Trello. Beloved by project managers everywhere, Trello is an easy and intuitive workflow tool that can help you stay on top of the job search process. It’s also free.

I purposefully omitted apps that find or aggregate job board listings, like the Indeed or Monster app. I did this for three reasons: 1) there are a billion of them, 2) they generally do the same things that the sites themselves do and therefore don’t provide any stand-alone value, and 3) they don’t work. Well, they work for finding job listings. They just don’t work very well for landing an actual job. As we’ve said before, you’re far more likely to find a job through networking than through a job board.

See all 7 ways and the complete TheHiedGuns article

4 Things You Need To Change About Your Job Search

Are you not feeling much love from your job applications? Perhaps you’re not getting many replies or interviews and you’re starting to feel as though you’re just throwing your CV into the wild with no idea where it actually ends up. If this sounds like you then maybe it’s time to make some changes to the way you’re job hunting.

1. Don’t bulk send your CV

When you’re job hunting you can feel as though you just want to send as many applications as you possibly can. You have over 10 tabs open with various jobs ready to fire out your CV and Cover Letter to each of them. Does this sound like you? If it does, you need to rethink your application process. We cannot stress enough the importance of catering your CV and Cover Letter to each application you make.

Yes, this will inevitably take more time and effort than just sending the same bog standard CV and Cover Letter, but it will probably give you much more joy with attaining interviews.

Read the job description, in particular the person specification, carefully and pick out some key words or skills that you will need for this role. If you believe that you have these skills and attributes yourself then add them into your CV and Cover Letter. Not only does this show the employer that you’re a good fit for the position, it also shows that you have actually read and retained information from the job ad.

2. Stop applying above your level

A great man once said ‘reach for the stars,’ but overreaching with your job applications doesn’t mean you’ll be able to bring it all back to you… (we’ll stop with the S Club 7 lyrics now!) Yes, it is always a good thing to have ambition and dream big, but if you’re a recent graduate applying for CEO or Manager positions it’s unlikely that you’ll get a lot of interviews. Unless you’re Mark Zuckerberg of course.

Job hunting is exhausting enough, so don’t make it harder for yourself by using energy applying for positions you know you aren’t qualified for. Try searching for jobs by ‘entry level’ and then refine your results by your own experiences and only apply for the roles you know you’re qualified for. This will save you time and energy.

See all 4 things and the complete article