Seven ways to tell if your job interview went well

by Lee Boyce

You step out of the job interview, take a deep breath and relax on your journey home after what can be a hugely stressful experience – especially if you really, really want the role.

But then the worry quickly beds in. Did I say the right things? Was the potential employer impressed? Should I chase up the recruitment agent or HR after not hearing anything after a few hours?

It can be hard to gauge just how well an interview has gone – and not much you can do to influence the employer once you step out of the interview.

As part of our Interview Cheat Series, we explore the key signals that show the interview has gone well.

4. Were future projects mentioned?

How can you tell if your working relationship has a future? The interviewer would probably mention to you where it’s going.

If they talked about how they would use your expertise into their future projects, plans, and developments and brought in other members of the team to discuss, it is likely you are a top contender for the role.

Not only does it show that they can see you adding value by working there, it also means you made a good enough impression to actually last, according to Reed.

5. Did you meet the team?

An invitation to meet the team is essentially a colleague trial run to show if you would fit in well with the characters already bedded into the firm.

It also means you have probably impressed in the interview and the recruiter is keen to see how you interact with the team before they make a final decision.

The advice here is to to keep impressing by staying polite and friendly with everyone you meet.

It is also the perfect opportunity for you to get a feel of the working environment.

Something as simple as a tour of the office or a chat with your potential colleagues can often be enough to figure out if a workplace is really right for you – and again shows the interviewer is probably keen for you to start.

Google launches its AI-powered jobs search engine

Looking for a new job is getting easier. Google today launched a new jobs search feature right on its search result pages that lets you search for jobs across virtually all of the major online job boards like LinkedIn, Monster, WayUp, DirectEmployers, CareerBuilder and Facebook and others. Google will also include job listings its finds on a company’s homepage.

The idea here is to give job seekers an easy way to see which jobs are available without having to go to multiple sites only to find duplicate postings and lots of irrelevant jobs.

With this new feature, is now available in English on desktop and mobile, all you have to type in is a query like “jobs near me,” “writing jobs” or something along those lines and the search result page will show you the new job search widget that lets you see a broad range of jobs. From there, you can further refine your query to only include full-time positions, for example. When you click through to get more information about a specific job, you also get to see Glassdoor and Indeed ratings for a company.  Read the full Tech Crunch article for more info.

Good at Texting? It Might Land You a Job

By Kelsey Gee

Struggling to get candidates to pick up the phone, employers try text messages for early-stage interviews

Your next job interview might happen via text message. Srsly.

Claiming that prospective hires are too slow to pick up the phone or respond to emails, employers are trying out apps that allow them to screen candidates and conduct early-stage interviews with texts.

“People don’t want to have that ten-minute [phone] conversation any more if they could just reply with a quick text,” said Kirby Cuniffe, chief executive of staffing firm Aegis Worldwide LLC. After Aegis recruiters reported that fewer potential hires were answering their phones, the firm decided to try texting. Since March, Indianapolis-based Aegis and Priceline Group ’s restaurant-booking service OpenTable have been using Canvas, a messaging app from Canvas Talent Inc. for text-based job interviews.

The app suggests interview questions employers can use, such as: “What motivates you?”

Its software analyzes candidates’ responses. Interviewers can rate answers with a thumbs-up or thumbs-down visible only to the employer and share transcripts of those text exchanges with co-workers.

Canvas charges employers around $300 per recruiter, and competes with similar apps such as Monster Worldwide Inc.’s Jobr.

The use of smartphone-based tools for job interviews shows how employers are trying to adapt to young workers’ communication habits. Some 12% of millennials—defined as those born between 1980 and the early 2000s—prefer the phone for business communication, according to a 2016 report on internet trends from venture-capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. By contrast, 45% prefer chatting online or exchanging messages by email or text.

Read the rest of the WSJ.com article

16 Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Job Search

How To Get A Job If You’re Over 50

Richard Eisenberg

When New York City employment attorney Lori B. Rassas wrote The Perpetual Paycheck: 5 Secrets to Getting a Job in 2015, I interviewed her for Next Avenue.  Now, she’s back with an excellent new book specifically for older job seekers, with the provocative title: Over the Hill But Not the Cliff.  So I rang her up again.

Here are highlights from our interview, with blunt advice for job seekers over 50:

Next Avenue: I have to start by asking you about the title. Why did you call the book ‘Over the Hill But Not the Cliff?’

Lori B. Rassas: The perception about older job applicants by some employers is that they get to a point in their career where they don’t want additional stress and they’re happy to coast until they retire. To undermine this, you need to show the employer: ‘I’m not done yet. I want to continue to learn and grow and move up.’ In the job interview, you should talk about things showing that you’re not at the top of the hill yet, you’re still climbing.

How serious a problem do you think ageism is for job seekers over 50?

I think it exists and is prevalent. You should assume you’re going to face it. But a lot of times, I find the cover letters of these people are not so great or they’re applying for the wrong jobs. I look at ageism as one obstacle to getting a job, but it can be overcome.

In some sense, I think the pendulum is shifting a bit, with Millennials moving jobs so quickly. I get a sense that employers want stability and long-term commitments and they’re more likely to get that from older job candidates. So things are almost getting better for older candidates.

You write that the most common reservation about hiring older candidates has nothing to do with their actual age, but what their age represents. What do you mean?   — Find out what she means, tips on getting the jobs, and the complete Forbes article

Haven’t Interviewed for a Job Lately? 10 Tips to Help You Prepare

Some people go years without interviewing for a new job simply because they have been happy with their current employment. Others haven’t interviewed lately because they might have been self-employed. Whatever the reason, not interviewing for a job in quite some time can affect how you handle yourself in an interview. You want to make sure you do everything right and say the right things when interviewing for Big Sky jobs.

To get you headed in the right direction, we have compiled a list of 10 tips to help you prepare for your job interview:

  1. Prepare Ahead of Time – One of the most important things you must do prior to a job interview is to prepare ahead of time. If you fail to prepare it will show in your answers and body language during the interview.
  2. Put an Emphasis on Your Good Qualities – Make sure you emphasize your good qualities during the interview. There is nothing wrong with self-promotion during a job interview. In fact, it is the only way you will get across your qualities.
  3. Ask Questions – Do not be afraid to ask questions. In fact, it is a vital part of the job interview. The interviewer should not be the only person asking questions during the job interview. When you ask questions it shows the interviewer how invested you are in the job and the company.

See all 10 Tips and the complete article