Good at Texting? It Might Land You a Job

By Kelsey Gee

Struggling to get candidates to pick up the phone, employers try text messages for early-stage interviews

Your next job interview might happen via text message. Srsly.

Claiming that prospective hires are too slow to pick up the phone or respond to emails, employers are trying out apps that allow them to screen candidates and conduct early-stage interviews with texts.

“People don’t want to have that ten-minute [phone] conversation any more if they could just reply with a quick text,” said Kirby Cuniffe, chief executive of staffing firm Aegis Worldwide LLC. After Aegis recruiters reported that fewer potential hires were answering their phones, the firm decided to try texting. Since March, Indianapolis-based Aegis and Priceline Group ’s restaurant-booking service OpenTable have been using Canvas, a messaging app from Canvas Talent Inc. for text-based job interviews.

The app suggests interview questions employers can use, such as: “What motivates you?”

Its software analyzes candidates’ responses. Interviewers can rate answers with a thumbs-up or thumbs-down visible only to the employer and share transcripts of those text exchanges with co-workers.

Canvas charges employers around $300 per recruiter, and competes with similar apps such as Monster Worldwide Inc.’s Jobr.

The use of smartphone-based tools for job interviews shows how employers are trying to adapt to young workers’ communication habits. Some 12% of millennials—defined as those born between 1980 and the early 2000s—prefer the phone for business communication, according to a 2016 report on internet trends from venture-capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. By contrast, 45% prefer chatting online or exchanging messages by email or text.

Read the rest of the WSJ.com article

16 Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Job Search

How To Get A Job If You’re Over 50

Richard Eisenberg

When New York City employment attorney Lori B. Rassas wrote The Perpetual Paycheck: 5 Secrets to Getting a Job in 2015, I interviewed her for Next Avenue.  Now, she’s back with an excellent new book specifically for older job seekers, with the provocative title: Over the Hill But Not the Cliff.  So I rang her up again.

Here are highlights from our interview, with blunt advice for job seekers over 50:

Next Avenue: I have to start by asking you about the title. Why did you call the book ‘Over the Hill But Not the Cliff?’

Lori B. Rassas: The perception about older job applicants by some employers is that they get to a point in their career where they don’t want additional stress and they’re happy to coast until they retire. To undermine this, you need to show the employer: ‘I’m not done yet. I want to continue to learn and grow and move up.’ In the job interview, you should talk about things showing that you’re not at the top of the hill yet, you’re still climbing.

How serious a problem do you think ageism is for job seekers over 50?

I think it exists and is prevalent. You should assume you’re going to face it. But a lot of times, I find the cover letters of these people are not so great or they’re applying for the wrong jobs. I look at ageism as one obstacle to getting a job, but it can be overcome.

In some sense, I think the pendulum is shifting a bit, with Millennials moving jobs so quickly. I get a sense that employers want stability and long-term commitments and they’re more likely to get that from older job candidates. So things are almost getting better for older candidates.

You write that the most common reservation about hiring older candidates has nothing to do with their actual age, but what their age represents. What do you mean?   — Find out what she means, tips on getting the jobs, and the complete Forbes article

Haven’t Interviewed for a Job Lately? 10 Tips to Help You Prepare

Some people go years without interviewing for a new job simply because they have been happy with their current employment. Others haven’t interviewed lately because they might have been self-employed. Whatever the reason, not interviewing for a job in quite some time can affect how you handle yourself in an interview. You want to make sure you do everything right and say the right things when interviewing for Big Sky jobs.

To get you headed in the right direction, we have compiled a list of 10 tips to help you prepare for your job interview:

  1. Prepare Ahead of Time – One of the most important things you must do prior to a job interview is to prepare ahead of time. If you fail to prepare it will show in your answers and body language during the interview.
  2. Put an Emphasis on Your Good Qualities – Make sure you emphasize your good qualities during the interview. There is nothing wrong with self-promotion during a job interview. In fact, it is the only way you will get across your qualities.
  3. Ask Questions – Do not be afraid to ask questions. In fact, it is a vital part of the job interview. The interviewer should not be the only person asking questions during the job interview. When you ask questions it shows the interviewer how invested you are in the job and the company.

See all 10 Tips and the complete article

Six Tips for Proofreading Your Resume

our resume is still a vital component to getting you the interview to the job of your dreams. It’s one of the first impressions that a hiring manager will have when you apply to a new job or position, and one of the biggest determinants about whether or not you will get called for an interview.

While you can upgrade your education and get more work experience, these things take time. So what’s the easiest way to improve your resume in the least amount of time? The answer is good proofreading.

You want your resume to accurately describe who you are as a professional. Because of this, you will want your resume to be completely free of errors.

Here are six ways to proof your resume so that it is impressive and error-free:

5) Take a break, and then give it a second look

Leaving a document alone for a while, doing something else and then coming back to it later, will give you a fresher set of eyes. It’s just like getting a second opinion. Try to leave an hour or so at least before giving it a second look.

6) Read it out loud

Sometimes, your eyes just don’t catch the mistakes. If you are an auditory learner, or if you want to double check your work, reading your resume out loud can help you identify problems with sentence structure and wording.

See all 6 tips and the complete HuffingtonPost article

7 Ways to Hack Your Job Search

By @TheHiredGuns

Your resume is polished. You’ve been networking like mad. Your interview suit is even pressed and ready to go at a moment’s notice. You’re also completely and totally exhausted. The job search is draining, and doing it right feels like a full-time gig. So why not hack your job search with these seven tips?

2. See Who Viewed Your LinkedIn Profile While Remaining Anonymous
One of the most frustrating parts of the LinkedIn experience is the privacy trade-off. If you want to browse profiles anonymously, you don’t get to see who viewed your own profile. Fortunately, there’s a sneaky way around that. Grab the LinkedIn app (if you haven’t already) and follow these instructions, courtesy of FullContact‘s Matt Hubbard:

1. Tap the blue “in” logo on the top left of the app’s home screen. You’ll see a few shortcuts, including Home, your profile, and others.

2. Find and tap the + Add Shortcut option at the bottom of this list.

3. Then select Who’s Viewed Your Profile on LinkedIn.

This enables you to research anonymously but still see who is viewing you – provided that they haven’t gone stealth also.

7. Manage Your Applications and Interviews Like a Pro
Keeping track of your applications, interviews, and follow-ups is a full-time job. Ditch the spreadsheet and start using Trello. Beloved by project managers everywhere, Trello is an easy and intuitive workflow tool that can help you stay on top of the job search process. It’s also free.

I purposefully omitted apps that find or aggregate job board listings, like the Indeed or Monster app. I did this for three reasons: 1) there are a billion of them, 2) they generally do the same things that the sites themselves do and therefore don’t provide any stand-alone value, and 3) they don’t work. Well, they work for finding job listings. They just don’t work very well for landing an actual job. As we’ve said before, you’re far more likely to find a job through networking than through a job board.

See all 7 ways and the complete TheHiedGuns article