Wednesday, January 28, 2015

8 Ingredients for Job Search Success

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

You Are 5 Steps Away from Finding a Job with Twitter

Marissa Venturella

You can follow your favorite celebrities and participate in clever hashtag games with a Twitter account, but Twitter can also be much more than an entertaining site you compulsively check. Rather than spending 20 minutes racking your brain for the most clever and creative way to explain what you are doing in 140 characters or less, follow the five tips below to use your Twitter account to find your next job.

1. Make your profile employer-friendly.
Your twitter handle should be professional. Many people in the industry suggest using some variation of your name. You can also use your biography to briefly state your credentials or the type of job you are looking for. Lastly, make your background relevant to your job search. Your background can be a great way to express yourself in an area other than the bio. For examples and inspirations check out this Mashable article.

2. Tweet about things relevant to your job search.

If you participate in an activity that relates to your potential future job or finally mastered that pesky skill that was holding you back, tweet about it. Let prospective employers know you are actively improving yourself and your skills in preparation for a new job. Also, simply tell people you are searching for a job. The Twitterverse is expansive so surely somebody will be able to help.

Steps 3-5 and the complete article

Monday, January 26, 2015

4 Resaons Why You're Not Moving Forward In Your Job Search, And Why You Won't


Every week, I receive scores of emails from job hunters all over the world who find me online and reach out to ask for help.  Their situations vary in detail, but the gist of many messages I receive is this:

“Kathy, I’ve been looking for a new job for X months, and I just can’t land one. I’ve been interviewing in my field (which I don’t really like but it’s where I have the most experience), and I’ve been applying online for jobs where I can, but nothing seems to work. I’m really discouraged, and feel I’m at the end of my rope.  I’m seriously considering changing directions in my career, but don’t know where to begin.  Can you offer any advice?”

I personally know what this feels like. I lost my job after a brutal layoff in the days following 9/11, and I took months to regroup.  I also struggled to find work after my first career reinvention (from corporate VP to therapist), and I know how disheartening it can be when, try as you might, nothing comes to fruition.  Clearly, times are tough.  But I’ve also seen that there are certain steps we can take to positively impact our job search outcomes.  Often, those who remain stuck are relying on outdated methods of finding work that won’t yield positive results today.  Here are some commonalities:

1) They’re approaching it in the wrong way.
The majority of unsuccessful job seekers I hear from are approaching the process the wrong way.  If you are focused on submitting your résumé online only or sitting at your computer looking at LinkedIn LNKD +3.24%, you’re not going to have the success you long for.  Today’s job search requires that you “bring yourself to market” in ways that will open new doors, build great connections, and get your name out there as someone who will enhance an organization.  It requires in-person connecting and making your mark, not just online submitting. (Recent studies have shown that 80% of jobs are found through networking.)

Get out there in the world and start making waves (the good kind). For example, reach out to all the colleagues you’ve ever enjoyed and respected, and reconnect, and ask how you can be of service to them.  Go to every industry or association meeting in your field and share in a compelling way what you love about the work you do (don’t go just to say “I need work.”) Volunteer to support a fabulous project in your community that will further your connections and demonstrate your talents.  As Forbes writer Susan Adams recommends, start your own networking group where you meet weekly or monthly to support each other’s efforts.   In short, stop “hunting” for work, and start being a source of positive energy, wisdom and motivation to others, and doors will open.

2) Discouragement and confusion (and paralysis) have set in.

When you’re looking for work, you need to understand that you’re facing very stiff competition, for every position you’re exploring.  Put yourself in the shoes of a hiring manager.  She wants the best match she can get for the money she’ll pay, and today, employers don’t have to compromise on what they want.  What do hiring managers want? They want someone who not only has all (or most) of the skills, experience, and background that match the job perfectly well, but they need to see excitement, commitment, energy, a can-do attitude and an upbeat personality from the candidate. If you can’t find a way to muster those qualities, you’re going to struggle.  (If you’re finding depression has set in and you feel you might benefit from outside help to navigate through it, don’t hesitate to explore some therapeutic support.)


Reasons 3,4, the solutions, and the complete Forbes article

Thursday, January 22, 2015

7 Things All Interviewers Want To Know About Your Brand

Cheryl Simpson

Your career brand is multifaceted and the good news is that, once defined, it can be shared with interviewers in many ways. Which is more good news, considering that your interviewers want to grasp the essence of your brand when they speak with you. In fact, all of their interview questions are aimed at clarifying your brand so they can evaluate its match to their needs.

Let’s take a look at seven questions interviewers ask themselves as they get to know you and the best ways for you to clarify Brand You™ in your interview responses.

1. What Sets Your Candidacy Apart?

What skills, experience, and credentials to you possess which make you a stronger candidate than the others who have applied? As interviewers slog through dozens of resumes and meet with candidate after candidate, they need to know what makes you different. They also need you to tell them this rather than expect them to figure out.

TIP: Summarize your strongest skills, experience, and credentials early in the interview, perhaps as a reply to the ubiquitous “tell me about yourself” question. Try this deceivingly simple but highly effective way to package your brand in reply to this question.

2. What Measurable Impact Have You Had To Date?

What specific measurable results have you achieved throughout your career that positively impacted your employers’ top- or bottom-lines? Define your revenue, sales, market share, profitability, cost reduction, productivity, and/or efficiency impacts in numerical terms.


TIP: Craft 5-8 CAR (challenge/action/results) statements that demonstrate the challenges you’ve faced with other firms, the actions you took to overcome them, and the measurable difference you made. Each CAR should address one or more of the key impacts employers are looking for; these are outlined in the job description and the job posting.

Read all 7 things and the complete Careeralism article

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

5 Mistakes You Should NEVER Make on a Cover Letter

Matthew Crist

You don’t get a second chance to make a great first impression and when it comes to applying for a job your cover letter is usually the first thing most employers will see. This is your chance to say “Hi, I’m here and you should really hire me” and any error will be the written equivalent of tripping over as you enter the room or spilling tea all over the boss.

It says everything about you right from the start – and that could be the bad as well as the good. It’s true that we can learn from our mistakes, but you really don’t want the application for the job of your dreams being the place to make them, do you? So ensure you don’t make them in the first place and enhance your chances of being invited for an interview by making sure your initial application stage is spot on!


Here are some of the most common – yet avoidable – cover letter mistakes that you need to guarantee you don’t make when applying for your dream job:

3) Not writing enough:

The secret to a great cover letter is getting the balance just right. Too long and you will lose the attention of the person writing it (they might receive hundreds of letters for just one job), too short and it won’t say enough about you to really catch their eye. Aim for around 200-250 words maximum and pick out some of the key reasons you feel you are the ideal candidate for the job, trying to focus on one major success story you are particularly proud of. “I successfully increased revenue by 200% during my time at the company”, for example.

If your letter is good enough then you’ll have the opportunity to tell them more about yourself at the interview stage.

4) Using generic text (To Whom It May Concern):

Whatever you do never use these five little words to address a cover letter. And come to think of it, Dear Sir/Madam isn’t much better either.

Do whatever you can to find out the hiring manager’s name, and address your letter to that person directly. Anything else will make you appear lazy and less than bothered if you get the job anyway.

Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and ask who it is that’s hiring for this position. You might get passed from pillar to post initially but remember, it’s a real person you are trying to impress here and little details like this can make a huge difference.

See all 5 mistakes and the complete TheUndercoverRecruiter article


Tuesday, January 20, 2015

10 Assumptions You Make That Kill Your Resume

By Lisa Rangel

Myth 2: Your resume needs charts and graphs to be impressive.


While I put charts and graphs in executive resumes for some of my clients, it is not the norm. Most clients can have achievements properly outlined in well-written content. Charts and graphs are often not digested by applicant tracking systems (ATS).


Myth 4: You Should put all of your experience on your resume


As a general rule, I do not go back more than 15 years. Even if what you did 25 years ago is applicable to what you are targeting today, no company will hire you for what you did 25 years ago. I believe, in most cases, putting 20+ years experience on your resume only dates you and does not really help your candidacy.


Myth 6: A great resume is the magic elixir to landing a job.


A great resume with an excellent job search plan, robust network, superb follow-up skills and an amazing attitude land you a job. The most fabulous resume alone will not get you a job.

See all 10 assumptions and the complete FastCompany article