Tuesday, November 18, 2014

7 Ways To Pump Up Your Resume



Hiring managers sometimes have to read over hundreds of resumes each day. They all start looking the same, as you can imagine. What does it take to write a strong, compelling resume that will catch their attention? Pump up your resume to make sure you’re considered for the position you want.

That’s the prize-winning question! Because hiring managers, recruiters, or HR assistants are individuals, they have different things they find appealing. What works for one, might not work for the next. But, there are some universal qualities that comprise a “good” resume that will appeal to the vast majority.

And, that’s what you’re shooting for. Something that gives your resume a better chance of getting read than the other resumes that are putting these poor folks to sleep. You want to improve the statistical probability that your resume will be selected for an interview.

Here are some safe bets for turning your light-weight resume into a heavy-weight contender. Nothing crazy here, folks, because you don’t want to stand out in a bad way! (Imagine your resume being passed around to other recruiters for them to giggle at.) For the right kind of attention, try these ways of pumping up your resume.

1. Avoid Using A Template

According to The Undercover Recruiter: “Using a template will never make you stand out and chances are your application will be cut short due to your resume being the same as every other job seeker’s.”

Your resume should have a unique design. But, what if you’re not a Microsoft Word wiz? Look on Youtube for lots of formatting how-to videos and tips.


4. Emphasize Your Personal Brand

Write about your personal brand strengths throughout your resume. Check out this article if you’d like to know more about personal branding. Here are some ways to get ideas for yours:
  • Ask others what they value in you and how you work.
  • Look for accomplishments on old performance evaluations.
  • Consider assessments to gain a deeper understanding of ways you can describe your strengths.

7. Put Your Best First

To really knock out your competition, don’t save the best for last! Front load each bullet point, putting the biggest part of the success first. Like this example:

Before:
Navigated intense challenges of recruitment to onboard astounding 17 director-level and researcher recruits.
After:
Brought onboard unprecedented 17 director-level and researcher recruits, navigating intense recruiting challenges.

You can also frontload your document with your biggest accomplishments in the summary. Don’t wait to hook them with your greatness! Put it out there right from the start.

Employers want to know what sets you apart! Why should they hire YOU? If your resume lands you an interview, but there’s another candidate you’re sparring in the ring with, it could be your amazingly strong resume that puts you over the edge and wins you the job.

That’s the sweet science of pumping up your resume. Now, go get ‘em, tiger!


Read all 7 ways and the complete Careerealism article

Monday, November 17, 2014

3 Strategies to Leverage the Value of Twitter in a job search

If these clients would tap into the research they’ve done on the companies they're targeting, they could reap plenty of benefits from Twitter in just 10 to 15 minutes, a few days a week, especially because the majority of job seekers aren’t doing anything with Twitter.


1. Stay Focused on Your Job Search and Your Personal Brand

Don't start or engage in conversations not related to your job search. No one really needs to know what you had for breakfast or what movie you saw last night.

Keep the majority of your tweets relevant to your personal brand, industry, areas of expertise, and value to your target companies. That doesn’t mean you can’t tweet off-topics and humorous tidbits, when you have extra time.


2. Do a Lot of Retweeting

Simply the act of tweeting again a tweet that someone else has tweeted, retweeting (abbreviated as "RT") is one of my favorite ways to use Twitter and one of the best ways to save time there.
Even if you do nothing else on Twitter, posting relevant retweets can be a powerful way to build brand evangelism, a quality Twitter following, and get on the radar and stay top-of-mind with people you want to notice you.

First, gather up a long list of the right people to retweet. Who are these people? Colleagues, industry thought leaders and subject matter experts, top-level executives (or hiring decision makers) at your target companies, and executive recruiters in your niche, to name a few.

Search for them on Twitter, follow them, and start retweeting them. It’s as easy as that!

It’s critical to include in your retweet the @username of the person who originated the tweet, because they’ll see the retweet on their "Notifications" page. Chances are you’ll get noticed, if enough of your retweets show up there for each person you’re retweeting. If a good retweet doesn’t mention the original author, take the time to track them down and include their @username.

Retweeting Strategies to Help You Get Noticed

See the strategies + Step 3 + the complete article

Friday, October 31, 2014

8 Scariest Comments Your Boss Can Make

8:  "We need to talk."
"We need to talk" is the most frightening phrase in all the world. It doesn't matter if you hear it from your partner or spouse or your boss. If you hear it from your boss there are only two outcomes: You are being fired or you are being given more work that you don't have time to do. Derivations include: "Can you step into my office?" and "Close the door behind you."

7:  "I need an update on the project."
Translation: Someone above your boss wants to know what is going on with your project. He or she is anxious for reasons that are either: a) so obvious, you were already working 80-hour weeks to finish it, or b) so opaque that you will now spend 80 hours per week finishing the project that no one wanted in the first place. If it's a client, you can bet the finished project will sit on a shelf three months after you finish it anyway. Derivations include: "The client has new parameters," and "Drop everything, Friday afternoon is a great time for a fire drill."

6:  "That was fine."
If your boss's response to "Did you get that thing I worked all night on?" is "That was fine," one of two things is true: a) It wasn't fine and the boss is going to fix it behind your back, or b) it wasn't important to begin with. Either way, you're in trouble. This is the ultimate "meh." And your career is now meh, too. Derivations include: "I submitted your annual review. Sign it when you get a chance. No we don't need to talk about it."

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

How to answer, “What’s your greatest weakness?” during a job interview

Amanda Augustine


This dreaded, seemingly trick question will no longer be difficult to answer in job interviews.
Most job candidates are familiar with the “What’s your biggest weakness?” interview question, but few feel equipped to answer the it with confidence.

The next time you’re asked the stress-inducing question in an interview, use these tips to provide a powerful response. 


Avoid faux weaknesses.

Recruiters and employers don’t want to hear that you’re a perfectionist or any of those other faux weaknesses that can be turned into strengths. They actually want to know about an area you’ve struggled with, and most importantly, what you’ve done to overcome that limitation. Steer clear of the “positive” weaknesses and stick to sharing something that’s genuine.


Choose something work-related.

This is not the time to discuss your fear of commitment or that you get awful road rage during rush hour. Focus on an area that’s relevant to your professional life. For example, perhaps you struggled with multi-tasking earlier in your career but have become a master at it in recent years.


Don’t mention essential skills.

Remember, the goal is to share a shortcoming that you’ve already taken steps to improve. This demonstrates to the hiring manager that you’re not only self-aware, but you’re dedicated to self-improvement.  If your greatest weakness is a critical requirement for the job and you’re still struggling in this area, then you may want to reconsider whether it’s the right role for you.


Use the STAR method to explain.  - See how to explain and the complete The Ladders article

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

How to Connect With Recruiters on LinkedIn



Whether you're looking for a job or just want to keep your options open, connecting with recruiters on LinkedIn can help maximize your networking opportunities. Here's how to approach recruiters to improve your chances of landing your dream job, today or down the road.

How to Find Recruiters:

1. Use LinkedIn's Advanced People Search to find recruiters in your field. In the keywords section, type in your field of interest and "recruiter." For example, searching for "accounting recruiter" would result in a list of all recruiters who are currently working or have worked in the past with accounting. The next step is to check their profile, so as to be sure they still are in the field you are interested in and to connect with them.


2. Since not all recruiters are interested in networking (which could seem strange, but is still true, especially if they work for niche organizations or have moved on to different roles), another way to approach recruiters more confidently is to search by adding the acronym "LION" in the last name section of the advanced search discussed above. LION stands for LinkedIn Open Networker. This allows you to search for people who've expressed an interest in connecting, so chances of them accepting your invite are higher. 

Tips 3-4 and How to Connect with Recruiters

Monday, October 13, 2014

How to answer "why did you leave your last job?" In a job interview


Hiring somebody is a huge and risky investment. Against the risks and the recruitment and ongoing costs -  wages, training, expenses and recruitment agency fees - is the aim and the hope that you will be worth the time and the money and be good enough and hang around long enough to be worth the hassle for more than a few weeks.

Sensible investors and sensible employers do their homework - their due diligence. They want a return on their investment long term. An employer would be daft if they didn’t want to know as much as possible about you before offering you a contract.

This is why the question about why you left your last job is a popular one. You shouldn't fear it - you should expect it, prepare for it and welcome it.


Here are some ideas about how to answer "Why did you leave your last job?":

Be open and honest
Whatever the reason you left your previous job, be honest about it. These are the sort of details that potential employers easily find out when checking references. Do not miss your job opportunity because of an unpleasant surprise or a “small lie” or because of an omission. If you left your last job under less than preferable circumstances portray it in a positive light - explaining how you have learnt from it. If you were fired, it is obviously more difficult than if you were made redundant - but preparing for the question can fix this.

More tips and the complete City A.M. article