Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Remove these 7 things from your resume ASAP

 

 







 
 
 

We constantly hear about what you should put on your resume, but we rarely talk about what to leave off.

As the CEO of a resume writing service, I’ve read more than a thousand resumes this year so far, and I’ve seen a lot of “junk” that doesn’t belong — things that can hurt your chances of landing an interview.

If you want to write a resume that says “Hire me,” then every word, number, line and achievement must be carefully considered. So let’s hit the backspace button on seven commonly overlooked things you should remove from your resume ASAP — and why:

1. Irrelevant hobbies and interests

Love esports? Camping? Coin collecting? Gardening? Everyone has a hobby, and most people think that the more unique it is, the more it will make them stand out from other candidates.

But hiring managers don’t care about how you spend your free time — at least not immediately. They have deadlines and large piles of resumes to review, and right now, they’re just focused on finding candidates who meet the requirements.

Of course, it’s okay to include your hobby if it’s related to the position you’re applying for. If it’s a finance job, for example, mentioning that you like to dabble in cryptocurrency investing can be seen as a plus. But if you’re trying to land a medical research assistant role, don’t bother.

4. Personal pronouns

Surprisingly, many candidates still make the mistake of using personal pronouns — “I,” “me,” “we” — on their resume.

Why leave out personal pronouns? Because it’s your resume, so it’s already implied that everything on it is about you. Instead of writing, “I managed 5 employees,” just put “managed 5 employees.”

5. The wrong kind of email

Hiring managers want candidates who are at least somewhat tech-savvy ... and that means not having an email address from an outdated account like AOL or Hotmail.

When in doubt, just stick with a Gmail or Outlook address.

See all 7 things to remove and the complete CNBC article

 

 

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

How to answer those bizarre riddle questions in a job interview

 By Stephanie Vozza

My niece Marley recently had a job interview for a quirky Michigan-based retailer. Towards the end of the interview, the manager asked her: “If Batman and Lobster Boy got into a fight, who would win?”

Her response? “Is the fight above or below water?”

She was hired on the spot.

I admit, I would have folded under that type of question and probably chosen Batman for no other reason than he’s Batman. But questions like this are more commonplace as companies try to screen for culture add.

In his book, How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? Secrets to Succeeding at Interview Mind Games and Getting the Job You Want, author William Poundstone offers insight and help. Poundstone admits he’s always been good at puzzles. After receiving several emails from friends who were going on job interviews and getting these riddle-like questions, he decided to write a book on the topic, collecting the unusual questions and offering advice on how to answer them.

“There are a lot of reasons companies ask these questions,” he says. “In tech, it’s almost a tradition to ask off-the-wall questions. This is also the case with startups that have a unique culture. For example, [eyeglass retailer] Warby Parker [managers] asks, ‘What’s the last costume you wore?’ They’re assuming you go to costume parties, which, in their opinion, means you’re hip.”

Why Creative Questions Are Effective

Candidates sometimes assume that creative questions are there to trick them, but the goal is to get the person out of the traditional interview mode. Everyone walks in with standard prepackaged answers to questions like, “Talk about a time when you disagreed your supervisor.” Or “What’s one of your biggest weaknesses?”

When the interviewer asks something out of left field, they can see how well the candidate handles a challenge. The added benefit is that these questions can help remove unconscious bias.

“There is an awful lot of subjectivity in interviewing,” says Poundstone. “It’s an exercise in confirmation bias. Interviewers make snap judgement about applicants when they come in, and they ask softball questions to confirm what they already think.”

The advantage to asking creative questions is they don’t always have a right or wrong answer, and they can provide a reality check when properly used, says Poundstone.

“The questions should deal with intangibles that are not on a résumé,” he says. “It’s checking to see if the person can think on their feet, which can indicate how well they learn on the job. The best way to use them is to make them standardized, asking the same question to each person so you have some baseline for evaluating. If you ask a different question, you’re in danger of giving an easier question to someone you like.”

How to Answer Them.....  Read how to answer the questions and the full Fast Company article

 

 

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

6 ways to avoid getting ignored when applying for jobs

If you keep getting ghosted when you apply for jobs, there may be several reasons the hiring manager at the other end of your email correspondence isn’t getting back to you. 

Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Hiring Experts Say These Are The Three Most Revealing Interview Questions They Ask

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

UFC Fighter Israel Adesanya Just Delivered Brilliant Career Advice

Mark Murphy

On Saturday night, in UFC 263's main event, Israel Adesanya successfully defended his UFC middleweight title, defeating Marvin Vettori in a unanimous decision. Adesanya delivered a clinic in mixed martial arts, but the lesson he gave in his post-fight interview may be even more powerful.

According to Adesanya, immediately after the fight, Vettori said that he believed he actually won the fight. But in the post-fight interview, Adesanya outlined exactly why an unwillingness to embrace a loss is a recipe for failure in life.

After his last loss, Adesanya said, "Certain people in my camp thought I won that fight, but I was just like, nah, it was close, but I'll take the 'L' from that one and I will grow. I will learn."

He continued, "How you grow is you learn from your mistakes. You go back to the drawing board and you improve. You become better from them. Loss is a part of life. Losses make you better. Just, I don't know where this whole mentality comes from that, oh, you took a loss and oh, that's it, you're over. But nah, it's part of life. Take it and let it improve you."

While Adesanya is clearly a physically gifted fighter, he also displays a remarkably growth-oriented and resilient mindset. Rather than shirking from his defeat, he embraced it head-on, seeing it as an impetus for improvement. And not only did he embrace the loss, he actually pushed back against his inner circle to ensure that they knew he was leaning into his defeat.

Read the rest of the Forbes article for more insights.


Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Pick One of These 7 Ways to Quit a Job

Dominique Rodgers

If you're wondering how to quit a job, think of it like dating. Quitting your job is like breaking up with a partner. Sometimes you feel terrible about it; other times you feel pretty darn elated to be moving on. Alternately, you could feel overwhelmingly neutral.

Do you find yourself contemplating jumping ship? Listen up. Harvard Business Review outlined seven different methods of quitting that employees use. Monster took a look at the quitting methods and is here to help you understand when it's appropriate to use each one—and when it's not. (For the record, going out in a blaze of swear words is never a good idea.)

How to Quit a Job: Your Options

1. The By-the-Book Quit

What HBR says it is: You meet with your manager to explain why you're leaving, and you give them a standard notice period.

What it might sound like coming out of your mouth: "I've accepted a position with XYZ. It's a step up for me, and I'm looking forward to a new challenge. My final day will be two weeks from now."

When you should use it: Consider this your default approach. It ticks all the boxes: It's respectful, professional, and gives your employer time to prepare for your grand exit. Choose this route when your workplace relationships are generally positive and when you have respect for your job.

When you should not use it: Avoid this method if your time at the company was filled with negative experiences or if you fear retribution from your supervisors. (If that's the case, see further down this list.)

2) The Grateful Quit

What HBR says it is: Similar to a by-the-book quit, giving notice by this method focuses more on how grateful you are for the opportunity to have worked at the company, and sometimes includes an offer to train a new person.

What it might sound like coming out of your mouth: "I can't believe I'm saying this, because I've loved every second of my time here and I'm so grateful for the opportunities I've been given...but I've accepted a position elsewhere. I will happily help train my replacement."

When you should use it: Use this approach when you want to end your job on a positive note and acknowledge that your supervisor or co-workers have gone above and beyond to make your time at your job really excellent. Offering to train your successor lessens the disruption and makes your manager's life easier. Not to mention, it makes you look super-professional—you don't necessarily have to be this nice, but it sure doesn't hurt your reputation.

When you should not use it: Skip this option if there's any negative vibes between you and your boss. You don't want your show of appreciation to be perceived as disingenuous. That could make your exit more tense than it needs to be.

See all 7 ways to quit and the complete Monster article

 

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

A self-made millionaire and CEO shares 5 ‘quick tests’ he always uses during job interviews to decide when to hire

Robert Reffkin

I never did that well on tests in school. But there are a number of simple tests that I’ve found helpful throughout my journey as the founder and CEO of a billion-dollar real estate technology company.

Having these quick tests in your back pocket helps you make smarter business decisions. Why? Because the more we think about something, the more our minds will try to play tricks on us. We second-guess, we let doubt and fear creep in, we hesitate, we overthink. The purpose of the five tests below is to get past all of that and get back to the truth that you’ve known deep down all along.

This is especially true regarding two of the most important decisions that managers at my company, Compass, make: When to hire someone, and when to pass on them.

1. The ‘good person’ test

Is this a good person?

If you have to take a long pause and struggle to answer this question, then they shouldn’t be on your team. Lots of people think goodness doesn’t matter at work — and some even think it’s a liability in business. Not me.

I always want to know: Do they live by the Golden Rule? Is their heart in the right place? Are they kind? Do they genuinely care about others? Do they want to give back? If everyone we work with is a good person, we’ll all be better off.

3. The ‘another offer’ test

If this person came to me tomorrow and told me they had a great offer from another company, would I fight to keep/win them over?

This test helps you admit that someone isn’t excellent, and it originated from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings. He believes that excellent people are much better than “pretty good” people.

As the motivational speaker Jim Rohn once said, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” So if you want to be better — like I know all of us do — one of the best ways is to do that is to make sure you’re surrounding yourself with exceptional people.

Read all 5 quick tests and the complete CNBC article