Thursday, September 16, 2021

Never make these 7 job interview mistakes ‘that will instantly destroy a first impression,’ says CEO of 20 years

Gary Burnison

It’s a statistic you’ve probably heard before: It only takes a few seconds for people to make a judgment about you, especially when it comes to job interviews.

During that very short time, a hiring manager will make crucial determinations about you, including your likability, your trustworthiness, how aggressive or passive you seem and how well you would fit in with others on the team.

As the CEO of a large job recruiting firm, I’ve seen a lot of sloppy job interviewing mistakes in my decades-long career. Here are some of the biggest that will instantly destroy a first impression:

3. Having no relevant examples of accomplishments

The interviewer asks you to elaborate on the accomplishments you’ve listed on your resume, and because you’re nervous, you mind goes blank. You stumble along, maybe even reading from a copy of your resume.

But the interviewer is listening for specifics to determine how you match the demands of the job and how well you would communicate with colleagues and clients.

The examples you give should cover four key areas:

  • The challenge (or opportunity) faced
  • The actions taken
  • The results achieved
  • The lessons learned from the experience

4. Talking too much or too little

The interviewer asks you a question that you’re not prepared to answer: “Tell me how you would handle [X] challenge…”

In a panic, you either you go on and on, hoping that you’ll say something relevant, or you give a short answer and then go silent. Yikes!

The best way to prepare is by rehearsing. Do a mock interview with a mentor or friend and practice giving clear and concise responses to common interview questions. (Don’t forget to ask the interviewer your own questions as well.)

5. Appearing desperate

Nonverbal cues like sitting on the edge of your chair or saying things like “When will I hear from you?” can radiate desperation.

It may also raise doubts about your abilities, your fit with the organization and why others haven’t hired you.

Some quick body language tips that will make you look more confident:

  • Make eye contact: You’ll appear friendlier and more focused.
  • Avoid looking down: You’ll appear distracted or lacking in confidence.
  • Arms free, not folded: You’ll project openness, while keeping your hands free to gesture.
  • Sitting forward/back: Leaning forward helps you present your ideas. If you lean back while listening, keep your posture open.
  • Smile: You’ll convey happiness and confidence, while making others feel good about themselves.

Read all 7 mistakes and the complete CNBC article

 

 

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Job Interview Statistics [2021]: What You Need To Know Before Starting Your Job Search

By Elsie Boskamp

Research Summary. Job interviews might be a nerve-wracking experience, but breaking the process down into facts and figures might make it seem a little less scary. After careful research, our team found that:

  • It takes the average person 24 weeks to go through the hiring and interview process and find a job.

  • On average, a candidate will get one interview request for every six applications they complete.

  • On average, women are 30% less likely to be selected for a job interview than men with similar qualifications and professional backgrounds.

  • The average corporate job opening gets 250 resumes — of those, between four to six will be called for an interview.

  • The interview process takes an average of 23 days.

  • The average applicant applies to 27 companies before landing an interview.


How Many Interviews Does it Take to Get a Job?

  • All job seekers have a 26.24% probability of receiving a job offer.

    Generally speaking, those who apply for 21 to 80 job postings have a 30.89% chance of receiving a job offer and getting hired, while job seekers who submit more than 81 applicants have a 20.36% chance of getting hired.

    After a job interview, it takes 20 to 40 days, on average, to receive a job offer. A rejected job offer usually comes five to eight weeks after a candidate’s first job interview.

  • Job seekers have a 36.89% chance of receiving a job offer after having one interview.

    Professionals who have had at least one job interview after two months of submitting an application have a 36.89% chance of receiving a job offer, while those who have had no interview after two months have a 9.94% chance of receiving an offer.

  • Job seekers who have had three job interviews have a 51% chance of getting hired.

    According to recruiters, people who have been selected for three job interviews have the greatest probability of receiving a job offer.

    Those who have had two interviews have a 17% chance, those who have had four interviews have a 22% chance, and those who have five or more interviews have a nine% chance of getting hired.

What Percentage of Applicants Get an Interview?

  • Job seekers who apply for more positions receive more interviews.

    Professionals who apply for one to ten jobs in a two-month period typically are asked to interview for 0 to two positions, while those who apply for 21 to 80 jobs usually have one to seven interviews.

  • Most job seekers receive one interview offer for every six applications they submit.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.3% of people who submit up to ten job applications and 35.1% of people who submit between 11 and 20 job applications receive one or two interview invitations.

Read the full article and see the stats for categories such as:

Average Length of a Job Interview

Job Interview Failure Statistics

Video and Phone Interview Frequency and Other Statistics

Job Interview Statistics by Age

Job Interview Statistics by Race

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, August 10, 2021

How to Get Hired After 50: 7 Tips That Will Help



 

 

 

 

 

 

Wendy Marx 

The job search process is not a piece of cake. From crafting a resume to networking to interviewing, it’s stressful. But add the challenges of applying for jobs after 50, and it can feel like you’ve entered a new, tougher arena. Let’s review some strategies and tips to get hired after 50 that will give you an edge.

But first things first.

How to Get Hired After 50: Your Mindset

Before I share strategies and tips to land a job after 50, let’s talk for a moment about the mindset you need for your job search.

Time and time again, I encounter people who are ashamed of their age and feel it will hold them back from landing the job they want. I know I’ve been there myself. Maybe you had a bad past experience or worry that everyone applying is so much younger.

This becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

First, we need to break this chain.

Forget about your age. It is, after all, just a number.

Instead, focus on the experience you have and skills you’ve learned along the way. That experience is something younger candidates lack. And that is one of your biggest assets.

Beyond your experience, you have wisdom. You have learned some hard truths including how to establish and maintain professional relationships that younger people still have to learn.

Take the time now to shift your point of view. Learn to see your age as a positive asset that will make you more valuable to your future employer. This mindset, plus the necessary resources, will make it easier to find and land the job you want.

Questions About How to Get Hired After 50

Now let’s talk about the specifics of landing a job after 50.

1. Update Your Resume

Give your resume a competitive edge by updating it for a modern job search.

Nowadays, your resume doesn’t just go to another human. Before it crosses someone’s desk, it’s usually reviewed by an applicant tracking system. This software organizes your information and scans it for industry keywords. If your resume lacks these keywords, it will likely be weeded out.

How do you combat this? Ensure you are current with the latest resume best practices. This includes knowing what keywords to include in your resume. To uncover the proper keywords do a brief Google search for resume keywords in your industry. Scan a company’s job description. Often, the words in their description are the ones that they seek in resumes.

And although it’s illegal to discriminate against someone based on their age, it’s best to safeguard your resume against such discrimination. Here are a few ways you can do this…

  • Go back only about 10-15 years in your job history.
  • Remove graduation dates from your education section.
  • Focus on the skills and experience you have.
  • Use a gmail account instead of hotmail or aol or other outdated email platforms.

2. Invest in Personal Branding

Personal branding might be the biggest key to how to land a job after 50.

What is personal branding?

Personal branding is the practice of marketing and promoting yourself just as you would a brand. A personal brand is more than your name and job title — it embodies your personality, values, and expertise.

Here are some ways to establish your personal brand.

First, establish a digital presence. Whether it’s on your website or on a network like LinkedIn, build up your brand by featuring your skills and experience. Create content that showcases your expertise, perhaps in a blog post or a LinkedIn article.

Then, use other social media networks to connect with others in your industry. Join groups on social media networks like Facebook and LinkedIn. Seek ways to engage others, perhaps by commenting on their posts or answering questions that pertain to your expertise.

This might seem like a lot of work, but it pays off. A personal brand has the power to give you name recognition within your industry and to distinguish you from other job candidates.

3. Use LinkedIn

While I’ve already mentioned this as part of your personal branding strategy, it deserves a separate point. LinkedIn is a powerhouse for any older professional. Consider some statistics. 55 million companies are listed on LinkedIn and around 14 million jobs are posted at any given time. 87% of recruiters report using the site regularly. You’ll even notice that many online applications ask for your LinkedIn URL as part of the process.

Post your profile and work experience on LinkedIn. If you haven’t been on the network in a while, update your profile with the most recent information and skills you’ve acquired.

Connect with others on the network, engaging with other professionals in your industry. You never know when such networking will work in your favor.

See all 7 tips and the complete Business 2 Community article

 

 

Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Remove these 7 things from your resume ASAP

 

 







 
 
 

We constantly hear about what you should put on your resume, but we rarely talk about what to leave off.

As the CEO of a resume writing service, I’ve read more than a thousand resumes this year so far, and I’ve seen a lot of “junk” that doesn’t belong — things that can hurt your chances of landing an interview.

If you want to write a resume that says “Hire me,” then every word, number, line and achievement must be carefully considered. So let’s hit the backspace button on seven commonly overlooked things you should remove from your resume ASAP — and why:

1. Irrelevant hobbies and interests

Love esports? Camping? Coin collecting? Gardening? Everyone has a hobby, and most people think that the more unique it is, the more it will make them stand out from other candidates.

But hiring managers don’t care about how you spend your free time — at least not immediately. They have deadlines and large piles of resumes to review, and right now, they’re just focused on finding candidates who meet the requirements.

Of course, it’s okay to include your hobby if it’s related to the position you’re applying for. If it’s a finance job, for example, mentioning that you like to dabble in cryptocurrency investing can be seen as a plus. But if you’re trying to land a medical research assistant role, don’t bother.

4. Personal pronouns

Surprisingly, many candidates still make the mistake of using personal pronouns — “I,” “me,” “we” — on their resume.

Why leave out personal pronouns? Because it’s your resume, so it’s already implied that everything on it is about you. Instead of writing, “I managed 5 employees,” just put “managed 5 employees.”

5. The wrong kind of email

Hiring managers want candidates who are at least somewhat tech-savvy ... and that means not having an email address from an outdated account like AOL or Hotmail.

When in doubt, just stick with a Gmail or Outlook address.

See all 7 things to remove and the complete CNBC article

 

 

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

How to answer those bizarre riddle questions in a job interview

 By Stephanie Vozza

My niece Marley recently had a job interview for a quirky Michigan-based retailer. Towards the end of the interview, the manager asked her: “If Batman and Lobster Boy got into a fight, who would win?”

Her response? “Is the fight above or below water?”

She was hired on the spot.

I admit, I would have folded under that type of question and probably chosen Batman for no other reason than he’s Batman. But questions like this are more commonplace as companies try to screen for culture add.

In his book, How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? Secrets to Succeeding at Interview Mind Games and Getting the Job You Want, author William Poundstone offers insight and help. Poundstone admits he’s always been good at puzzles. After receiving several emails from friends who were going on job interviews and getting these riddle-like questions, he decided to write a book on the topic, collecting the unusual questions and offering advice on how to answer them.

“There are a lot of reasons companies ask these questions,” he says. “In tech, it’s almost a tradition to ask off-the-wall questions. This is also the case with startups that have a unique culture. For example, [eyeglass retailer] Warby Parker [managers] asks, ‘What’s the last costume you wore?’ They’re assuming you go to costume parties, which, in their opinion, means you’re hip.”

Why Creative Questions Are Effective

Candidates sometimes assume that creative questions are there to trick them, but the goal is to get the person out of the traditional interview mode. Everyone walks in with standard prepackaged answers to questions like, “Talk about a time when you disagreed your supervisor.” Or “What’s one of your biggest weaknesses?”

When the interviewer asks something out of left field, they can see how well the candidate handles a challenge. The added benefit is that these questions can help remove unconscious bias.

“There is an awful lot of subjectivity in interviewing,” says Poundstone. “It’s an exercise in confirmation bias. Interviewers make snap judgement about applicants when they come in, and they ask softball questions to confirm what they already think.”

The advantage to asking creative questions is they don’t always have a right or wrong answer, and they can provide a reality check when properly used, says Poundstone.

“The questions should deal with intangibles that are not on a résumé,” he says. “It’s checking to see if the person can think on their feet, which can indicate how well they learn on the job. The best way to use them is to make them standardized, asking the same question to each person so you have some baseline for evaluating. If you ask a different question, you’re in danger of giving an easier question to someone you like.”

How to Answer Them.....  Read how to answer the questions and the full Fast Company article

 

 

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

6 ways to avoid getting ignored when applying for jobs

If you keep getting ghosted when you apply for jobs, there may be several reasons the hiring manager at the other end of your email correspondence isn’t getting back to you. 

Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Hiring Experts Say These Are The Three Most Revealing Interview Questions They Ask

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

UFC Fighter Israel Adesanya Just Delivered Brilliant Career Advice

Mark Murphy

On Saturday night, in UFC 263's main event, Israel Adesanya successfully defended his UFC middleweight title, defeating Marvin Vettori in a unanimous decision. Adesanya delivered a clinic in mixed martial arts, but the lesson he gave in his post-fight interview may be even more powerful.

According to Adesanya, immediately after the fight, Vettori said that he believed he actually won the fight. But in the post-fight interview, Adesanya outlined exactly why an unwillingness to embrace a loss is a recipe for failure in life.

After his last loss, Adesanya said, "Certain people in my camp thought I won that fight, but I was just like, nah, it was close, but I'll take the 'L' from that one and I will grow. I will learn."

He continued, "How you grow is you learn from your mistakes. You go back to the drawing board and you improve. You become better from them. Loss is a part of life. Losses make you better. Just, I don't know where this whole mentality comes from that, oh, you took a loss and oh, that's it, you're over. But nah, it's part of life. Take it and let it improve you."

While Adesanya is clearly a physically gifted fighter, he also displays a remarkably growth-oriented and resilient mindset. Rather than shirking from his defeat, he embraced it head-on, seeing it as an impetus for improvement. And not only did he embrace the loss, he actually pushed back against his inner circle to ensure that they knew he was leaning into his defeat.

Read the rest of the Forbes article for more insights.


Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Pick One of These 7 Ways to Quit a Job

Dominique Rodgers

If you're wondering how to quit a job, think of it like dating. Quitting your job is like breaking up with a partner. Sometimes you feel terrible about it; other times you feel pretty darn elated to be moving on. Alternately, you could feel overwhelmingly neutral.

Do you find yourself contemplating jumping ship? Listen up. Harvard Business Review outlined seven different methods of quitting that employees use. Monster took a look at the quitting methods and is here to help you understand when it's appropriate to use each one—and when it's not. (For the record, going out in a blaze of swear words is never a good idea.)

How to Quit a Job: Your Options

1. The By-the-Book Quit

What HBR says it is: You meet with your manager to explain why you're leaving, and you give them a standard notice period.

What it might sound like coming out of your mouth: "I've accepted a position with XYZ. It's a step up for me, and I'm looking forward to a new challenge. My final day will be two weeks from now."

When you should use it: Consider this your default approach. It ticks all the boxes: It's respectful, professional, and gives your employer time to prepare for your grand exit. Choose this route when your workplace relationships are generally positive and when you have respect for your job.

When you should not use it: Avoid this method if your time at the company was filled with negative experiences or if you fear retribution from your supervisors. (If that's the case, see further down this list.)

2) The Grateful Quit

What HBR says it is: Similar to a by-the-book quit, giving notice by this method focuses more on how grateful you are for the opportunity to have worked at the company, and sometimes includes an offer to train a new person.

What it might sound like coming out of your mouth: "I can't believe I'm saying this, because I've loved every second of my time here and I'm so grateful for the opportunities I've been given...but I've accepted a position elsewhere. I will happily help train my replacement."

When you should use it: Use this approach when you want to end your job on a positive note and acknowledge that your supervisor or co-workers have gone above and beyond to make your time at your job really excellent. Offering to train your successor lessens the disruption and makes your manager's life easier. Not to mention, it makes you look super-professional—you don't necessarily have to be this nice, but it sure doesn't hurt your reputation.

When you should not use it: Skip this option if there's any negative vibes between you and your boss. You don't want your show of appreciation to be perceived as disingenuous. That could make your exit more tense than it needs to be.

See all 7 ways to quit and the complete Monster article

 

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

A self-made millionaire and CEO shares 5 ‘quick tests’ he always uses during job interviews to decide when to hire

Robert Reffkin

I never did that well on tests in school. But there are a number of simple tests that I’ve found helpful throughout my journey as the founder and CEO of a billion-dollar real estate technology company.

Having these quick tests in your back pocket helps you make smarter business decisions. Why? Because the more we think about something, the more our minds will try to play tricks on us. We second-guess, we let doubt and fear creep in, we hesitate, we overthink. The purpose of the five tests below is to get past all of that and get back to the truth that you’ve known deep down all along.

This is especially true regarding two of the most important decisions that managers at my company, Compass, make: When to hire someone, and when to pass on them.

1. The ‘good person’ test

Is this a good person?

If you have to take a long pause and struggle to answer this question, then they shouldn’t be on your team. Lots of people think goodness doesn’t matter at work — and some even think it’s a liability in business. Not me.

I always want to know: Do they live by the Golden Rule? Is their heart in the right place? Are they kind? Do they genuinely care about others? Do they want to give back? If everyone we work with is a good person, we’ll all be better off.

3. The ‘another offer’ test

If this person came to me tomorrow and told me they had a great offer from another company, would I fight to keep/win them over?

This test helps you admit that someone isn’t excellent, and it originated from Netflix CEO Reed Hastings. He believes that excellent people are much better than “pretty good” people.

As the motivational speaker Jim Rohn once said, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” So if you want to be better — like I know all of us do — one of the best ways is to do that is to make sure you’re surrounding yourself with exceptional people.

Read all 5 quick tests and the complete CNBC article

 

 

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

The 10 Best Remote Career Fields For New College Grads

Mark C. Perna

As companies ramp up their hiring, college grads are entering a job market replete with opportunities—especially in remote work. Here’s who is hiring and what you need to do to land that first job.

Let me extend an early congratulations to the graduating class of 2021. You’ve all persevered through an incredibly trying time in order to cross this threshold. So what’s next? The good news is that, while hiring isn’t quite back to pre-pandemic levels, the overall job market is building steam. According to a report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), employers are projecting that they’ll be hiring 7.2% more new college graduates from the Class of 2021 than they hired from the Class of 2020.

“While hiring isn’t yet back to pre-pandemic levels,” said Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs, “the overall job market is gaining momentum, and that includes a stronger remote job market as well.”

What’s interesting is that when FlexJobs surveyed soon-to-graduate workers about their job preferences, some 32% of participants reported that they would give up some vacation time for the opportunity to work remotely as much as they wanted to, while 24% said they would take less pay for the chance to work outside the office. As the world of work evolves, being willing to work remotely can help a new grad land their first job.  

“Remote work can remove the geographic limitations to a job search, so focusing on work-from-home jobs can also significantly increase access to potential job opportunities,” says Sutton.

That means members of the 2021 graduating class (unlike those from a year earlier) have a great shot at starting their professional career sooner rather than later. 

10 hot remote job categories

FlexJobs has identified the top 10 career categories that currently have the greatest number of remote entry-level positions. Among these categories, HR & Recruiting, sales and call center entry-level remote listings have grown at least 25% since January 2021.

6.    Bilingual 

7.    Sales 

8.    Data Entry 

9.    Computer & IT 

10. HR & Recruiting


4 tips for landing that new job

When it comes to getting hired, the FlexJobs Career Coaching Team suggests the following four tips:

 1. Make time to focus

The best way to get hired is to get focused and organized. For example, make daily to-do lists that might include tasks like: Revising a cover letter, sending out three applications and spending a half-hour on LinkedIn exploring connections. 

2. Update your resume

If you’ve been making the time to update your skills, update your resume to reflect that. Don’t forget to include any internships, volunteer activities and school-based activities you engaged in as well. And, if you want to work remotely, add any experience you’ve had with remote classes, remote group projects or remote internships and jobs.

See all 10 job categories + all 4 tips for landing the job AND the complete Forbes article

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

6 Tips to blow them away within the first few minutes of your tele-interview

Sarah Dillon

Interviews can be a daunting event that can cause even the most confident person to begin wiping their sweaty palms on their pants. To ease some of the pre-interview anxiety it’s best to know the qualifiers hiring managers look for in potential candidates.

For a step-by-step guide on how to make the best impression for your next interview held over Zoom, I’m happy to share an interview I held recently with the CMO of Hibob, Rhiannon Staples.

Rhiannon Staples has a demonstrated background in marketing and she has a few tips on how to best market yourself via the realm of telecommunication tools.

1. Interviews now that they are remote have different qualifiers for how to make a good first impression. What do you notice first when that Zoom screen pops up?

“People have just a few seconds to make a first impression, and on Zoom, it’s not just about you but also about your background. The first thing an interviewer will notice will be the person on the other end’s surroundings, as well as their appearance. To prepare, an easy suggestion is to log on early to ensure your camera and microphone are working in order to avoid tech glitches and be ready on time. You can also ask yourself the following: can the interviewer see you clearly? Is the background clear of any mess?”

“Job candidates should make sure they have good lighting, in addition to a clean-looking backdrop. Dressing nicely and in a polished manner should also be kept top of mind for job seekers. If possible, previewing yourself before joining the Zoom call is suggested.”

4. What kind of things should you have in the background of your Zoom call to come off more professional?

“The less distraction in your background, the better. Having a blank wall behind you is best, however, consider a simple, clean virtual background to avoid distractions. You can also consider a preprogrammed Zoom background or use the blurring feature. People realize that everyone is at home and – in many cases – will have less control over their surroundings.”

5. Should you start the interview with casual questions or should you get right down to the interview? Is it better to let the interviewer start first to feel the tone of what kind of interviewing style they prefer so you can fall in line with that cadence?

“It is best to have the interviewer start first since they are ultimately guiding the conversation and asking the questions. This also sets the tone surrounding what kind of casual questions will be okay to ask throughout the interview, and what kind of overall experience the interviewer will cultivate. When the interviewer asks what questions you have at the end, feel free to ask any questions that will help you better understand if the job, the culture and the company are a good fit for you. The questions you ask can leave an impression when a hiring manager is considering multiple candidates for the open role.”

See all 6 tips and the complete The Ladders article

 

 

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

10 Inspiring Career Podcasts to Add to Your Playlist

By Adrianne Bibby

Podcasts with a focus on building a great career can be inspiring, insightful, and timely resources.

So, which career podcasts out there may be of interest to you? We’ve surveyed the landscape and come up with a variety of options that may help you plot your job search strategy and build a flexible, rewarding career.

10 Career-Focused Podcasts

 

1) Bossed Up

Tackling “a new career conundrum” in each episode, Bossed Up works to offer women and marginalized professionals the tools and confidence they need to move forward in their careers, on their own terms. Founder Emilie Aries is the host, exploring data-driven, tactical, and pragmatic insights in weekly sit-downs with industry experts.

2) CareerCloud

Downloaded more than 2,500 times a day, CareerCloud has guests like career coaches, resume writers, hiring managers, recruiters, and everyday job seekers. Topics include interview tips, networking strategies for recent grads, advice for seasoned professionals on how to get promoted, and more. CareerCloud is a resource to help listeners “build a career and a life of your choosing.”

7) Repurpose Your Career

Targeting people in “the second half of life,” Repurpose Your Career is a podcast offered by Career Pivot, an organization that helps professionals make changes later in their careers. Host and author Marc Miller, who’s made six career pivots over three decades, provides actionable strategies to help people who may feel overwhelmed by late-career shifts.

8) Side Hustle School

Ready to start your own side hustle? This daily podcast teaches you how to start a side job with just 20 minutes a day to help you explore new career opportunities, bring in more income, learn new skills, and provide employment security.

See all 10 Podcasts and the comlplete Flexjobs article

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

The 10 Worst Resume Mistakes to Avoid

Peter Vogt

You’ve been applying to jobs like crazy, but it seems as though all of your applications have disappeared into the black hole of the Internet. Wondering why your resume isn’t getting you any interviews? We’re willing to bet it’s not because you’re unqualified or just not good enough (which, for the record, you are good enough). It’s likely because resume mistakes are causing one or more fatal errors.

Job seekers, beware! All it takes is just one to strike your job search dead in its tracks. Definitely something entry-level workers need to be on the lookout for when writing your first resume.

Think your resume is perfect and bulletproof? Even the most experienced professionals still find themselves guilty of making resume mistakes. Plural.

With only a mere six seconds to “wow” a recruiter, having any kind of mistake on your resume is not a risk even the most daring of job seekers should take. After all, your resume is the first point of contact you make with a potential employer, so you want that first impression to be a strong, clear demonstration of just how awesome you are at what you do. That’s how you get an interview—and then once you rock that, a job.

As you write your resume—or give your resume its six-month update—make sure it doesn’t include any of these common resume mistakes listed below.

2. Lack of Specifics

Your resume shouldn’t simply state the obvious to a hiring manager. Employers need to understand what you've done and accomplished. For example:

A. Worked with employees in a restaurant setting
B. Recruited, hired, trained and supervised more than 20 employees in a restaurant with $2 million in annual sales

Both of these phrases could describe the same person, but the details and specifics in example B will more likely grab an employer's attention.

3. Attempting the "One–Size–Fits–All" Approach

Whenever you try to develop a generic resume to send to all job ads, you almost always end up with something employers will toss in the recycle bin. Your lack of effort screams, “I’m not particularly interested in your company. Frankly, any ol’ job will do.”

Employers want to feel special and want you to write a resume specifically for them. They expect you to clearly show how and why you fit the position in a specific organization.

4. Highlighting Duties Instead of Accomplishments

Your resume needs to show how good you are at your job, but it's all too easy to slip into a mode where you simply start listing your duties. For example:

  • Attended group meetings and recorded minutes
  • Worked with children in a day-care setting
  • Updated departmental files

That’s more or less an echo of your job description. Employers, however, don't care so much about what you've done as what you've accomplished in your various activities. One of the most basic resume tips is to go beyond showing what was required and demonstrate how you made a difference at each company, providing specific examples. They're looking for statements more like these:

  • Recorded weekly meeting minutes and compiled them in a Microsoft Word-based file for future organizational reference
  • Developed three daily activities for preschool-age children and prepared them for a 10-minute holiday program performance
  • Reorganized 10 years worth of unwieldy files, making them easily accessible to department members

Need help? Ask yourself these questions:

  • How did you perform the job better than others?
  • What were the problems or challenges faced? How did you overcome them? What were the results? How did the company benefit from your performance?
  • Did you receive any awards, special recognitions, or promotions as a result?

See all 10 mistakes and the complete Monster article

 

 

 

Thursday, April 15, 2021

How to ace the 50 most common interview questions

Travis Bradberry

Most people’s biggest job-hunting fear is being put on the spot by oddball interview questions such as these (which are real):

“Describe the color yellow to someone who’s blind.” – Spirit Airlines

“If you were asked to unload a 747 full of jelly beans, what would you do?” – Bose

“Who would win in a fight between Spiderman and Batman?” – Stanford University

Offbeat questions are nearly impossible to prepare for, and they don’t achieve the interviewer’s objective—to test out-of-the-box thinking and the ability to perform under pressure. That’s the bad news.

The good news is that companies are moving away from them. Recent research shows these questions do little more than boost the interviewer’s confidence. Even companies famous for oddball questions are abandoning them. In the words of Laszlo Bock, Google’s former HR chief:

“If you’ve heard that Google likes to pose brain-teaser questions to candidates—like why manhole covers are round—your information is out of date. There’s no evidence that they suggest how people perform on the job.

Glassdoor study of tens of thousands of interviews found the 50 questions you’re most likely to be asked in your next interview:

1. What are your strengths?

2. What are your weaknesses?

3. Why are you interested in working for us?

4. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?

5. Why do you want to leave your current company?

See all 50 questions

Though these questions may be less exciting to prepare for than “Spiderman vs. Batman,” they are what you need to be ready for.

Most interviewees are only prepared for about 10 questions, so this list alone can give you a leg up. Study the list carefully and have answers ready—but not robotically rehearsed—so that you can speak comfortably, flexibly, and confidently about each of these topics.

If you want to make a great impression and stand out from the crowd, preparing for these 50 questions is not enough. Follow the 9 strategies below and weave the knowledge they impart into your responses. Then you’ll truly ace your interview.

1. Identify Your “Hook”

Most hiring managers interview a lot of people. So many that they generally have to go back to their notes to remember candidates—the exception being candidates with a strong hook. Sometimes these hooks are how people dress or their personality, but the best hook is a strong story that’s work-related. When you can wow an interviewer with a memorable story that shows what a strong candidate you are, you’ll rise to the top of the list.

3. …And Know What Makes You A Great Fit For It

Know exactly what makes you fit into the position perfectly and speak to it during the interview. What you makes you special? It could be that you’re an idea machine, or a statistical fanatic. Whatever it is, know it and prepare to fit it into your responses.

For example, when an interviewer asks, “What are your strengths?” skip the clichés and go right into qualities about you that are unique to the job. You’ll make it clear that you’re the perfect fit.

6. Practice, Practice, Practice

You, and everyone else interviewing for the job, already know many of the questions you’ll be asked. The difference lies in preparation. Preparing unique and position-specific responses will give you the competitive edge over everyone else. You don’t need to memorize answers, but instead know certain points of reference about yourself that you can apply to different questions.

Make sure to “mock interview” yourself. Video your responses until you’re able to speak comfortably and flexibly—as opposed to rotely regurgitating answers—about your prepared topics. Videoing yourself may feel awkward when you do it, but it will pay off during your interview.

Read all 9 tips for answering the top 50 questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

10 questions to ask in a job interview that will really expose a company’s culture

By Karen Eber

You are in the last five minutes of the job interview, and the interviewer asks: What questions do you have?”

Time is limited, so you ask the question you think will be most helpful: “What is the culture like here?”

Don’t do this. There are better questions to understand the culture. 

The interviewer will typically respond by describing the values of the company. Their reply will have some variation of trust, collaboration, transparency, integrity which are the same values that show up in various forms in many companies. These don’t help you understand the day-to-day experience.

Culture is felt through the behaviors that are reinforced or discouraged on a day-to-day basis on teams. If you want to get a sense of the story of the leader and team’s culture, use detailed questions. You will get a much better sense based on the responses, especially if the leader struggles to think of what to say. If you are a manager, prepare to answer detailed questions that illustrate your team’s culture. 

Better questions to ask a hiring manager:

1) Tell me about a time a team member changed your mind?  This lets you know if the leader feels they are the only one who has the answers or if they are open to different opinions. You are going to learn how they prefer to receive information and what they value. 

4) Describe a recent success or win. They should be able to come up with something pretty quickly. If they can’t, that might indicate that they aren’t great about celebrating progress or recognizing people along the way to milestones. They don’t have to describe a huge win. However, they should be able to think of a recent event that demonstrates progress. 

8) Tell me about the last person you recognized. Recognition can be a thoughtful conversation, an email, an award, or even a mention in an all-hands meeting. You want to see if the leader struggles to come up with an example or easily mentions individual and team recognition. Does the leader have the mindset that development includes helping people see the contributions they are making?

See all 10 questions and the complete Fast Company article

 

 

Thursday, April 8, 2021

The 25 questions you should know in a job interview

You already got the interview , it's time to talk about yourself! An opportunity opens up to keep the job and the first question is: are you ready?

Have you ever walked out of an interview thinking you didn't give 100%? Feeling like you failed to convince the recruiter and sell yourself? You are not the only one! The job interview is part of the process when looking for a job, and there are two fundamental tips to master it: Prepare and Practice

Miguel Ángel Rangel, Recruitment and Selection Manager of Deloitte Mexico, recommends that candidates review the information placed on the resume and not put false information , since later the recruiter will notice it.

“Practice a lot, go to a lot of interviews. Sometimes you have to put two or three 'No' together to get a 'Yes'. They will realize that many questions are repeated and they will be able to answer better ”, he commented during his participation in Expo City OCC .

Here's a compilation of the most common interview questions and how you can answer them wisely. So know the 25 questions that the recruiter will surely ask you:

The icebreakers

They seem casual or 'light' but they are focused on getting more information than you think. Find out why.

1. Tell me about yourself. The recruiter doesn't want to know your life story , they are giving you the opportunity to speak openly about your 'professional self'. Avoid sharing personal information , focus on your work profile, your strengths and show enthusiasm.

2. Why are you interested in the position? Take the opportunity to show your enthusiasm for the job.

3. What do you know about our company? Prepare in advance and do your research on the company: mission , history, values , earnings, business units and social networks.

The uncomfortable

They will go deep into your professional life with the intention of detecting red flags. Anticipate your response so you are not caught off guard.

6. Why did you leave your previous job? Why do you want to change jobs? Leave out the negative comments about your past work experience , focus on your desire to grow and how this position surpasses the one you have or had before.

The difficult ones

They provide the recruiter with key information about your professional profile , think carefully before answering.

11. There is a gap in your work experience, what did you do during that time? Highlight productive activities such as: volunteer work, taking a course, finishing your studies.

12. Tell me about a moment in your work life where you made a mistake, how did you solve it? We all make mistakes at work, but there are those who have the ability to intelligently approach their mistake and find a solution. Show that you are that person.

Read all 25 questions and the complete Entrepreneur article

 

 

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Not asking these 4 questions at the first interview will kill your chances

Samantha Hawrylack

Many people prepare for questions during the interview, but did you know that you should ask questions afterward, too?

It happens at the end of every interview. The interviewer asks, ‘Do you have any questions for me?’ Most people naturally respond ‘no.’ That’s the worst thing you could say, though.

It shows that you aren’t engaged or interested in the job. Unless you’re a superhero and can learn everything you need to know about the job in the 30 – 60 minutes the interview took, you’re bound to have questions.

So what should they be? Here are a few examples.

1) How has the position changed over the years?

Most positions evolve in some ways – some are big, and some are small. Ask about the history of the position, and you’ll find out if more responsibilities have been added or if the position changed direction altogether.

This tells you a few things. One, if there was a recent change in the responsibilities, it could be why the previous person left. Make sure it’s something that fits within what you want.

Two, it could mean the position is one with possibilities. If you plan to grow with the company, knowing that they constantly change the position’s responsibilities could be a good thing.

4) What are the next steps in the interview process?

If you’re interested in the job after you’ve gone through the interview, it’s natural to ask about the next steps. This shows that you’re forward-thinking and want to plan for the next steps.

This takes some of the anxiety out of waiting for the phone to ring or the employer to send you an email asking you back for another interview or offering you the job. 

If you want the job, you have to show that you want it. Don’t let the interview end when the interviewer stops asking questions. This is your opportunity to turn the tables.

Ask any questions you have about the company or about your future with the company. Don’t be afraid to sound too forward or too inquisitive. Employers like to see people go after what they want. It shows that you may do the same thing if they hire you.

Read all 4 questions and the complete theladders article