Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How To Answer The Salary Question On Online Job Applications And Other Common Job Search Negotiation Questions Answered

Caroline Ceniza-Levine

Here are five job search negotiation questions:

1 - How do you address online applications that require a dollar figure and avoid being screened out?

Getting the salary question so early in the hiring process is one of the reasons to avoid online applications if you can help it. It’s hard to give a desired salary when you don’t know much about the job. The desired salary should always be about the job at hand, not what you were making before, what you hope to make, even what you think you deserve.

Therefore, if possible, try to get referred to someone and get a chance to speak with people to learn more specifics about the job before suggesting a salary. However, sometimes you don’t don’t have an existing connection into the company, and you want to apply before too many others apply. First, see if you can just skip the question or write a text response (such as “commensurate with responsibilities of the job”). If not, put a nonsensical number like $1 so that you can move past the question. If you get asked about the $1 response in the first interview, then you can mention that you need to learn more about the job first before estimating the appropriate salary.

2 - How do you avoid mentioning a salary range during your first interview?

Related to the first question, another attendee wanted to avoid giving a salary range, not just at the application stage, but even in the first interview. While I agree that you want to have as much detail about the job as possible before quoting a desired salary, you don’t want to avoid discussing salary at all costs. Some recruiters don’t move forward with a candidate if they don’t have an idea of target salary because the candidate might be too expensive and it’s a waste of everyone’s time. Refusing to discuss salary may prevent you from moving forward.

Therefore, you don’t want to avoid mentioning a salary range at all – just avoid mentioning a salary target too soon. Too soon is when you’re not clear about the job. It’s also too soon to discuss salary if you have not researched the market and may underestimate or overestimate your value. For that reason, you should be researching salaries now, even before you get into an interview situation. You don’t want to be caught unprepared to discuss salary. Your lack of readiness is a problem for you, not the employer.

Read Questions / Answers 3-5 and the complete Forbes article

Thursday, November 7, 2019

The 25 Best Keywords for You in Your Job Search - Build Your Personal SEO

By Susan P. Joyce

A CareerBuilder study released in August 2018 revealed that employers are less likely to contact an applicant they cannot find online because they "expect candidates to have an online presence."

Clearly, being found online today is NOT optional if you want to have a successful career (and job search).

To be found, implement personal SEO ("search engine optimization"). 

Personal SEO requires that you create relevant web content, containing appropriate keywords, so that it ranks well when someone is searching for those keywords.

For most professionals, this means a complete LinkedIn Profile and consistent visibility inside LinkedIn. But, simply having a LinkedIn Profile is NOT enough unless you are paying attention to your keywords.

To be found, implementing effective personal SEO is a necessity.

Keywords Are the Key to Being Found in Search

The right keywords, most appropriate for you and your goals, are the foundation of successful personal SEO.
KEYWORDS: The terms used by searchers to find relevant content in a search engine, social network, applicant tracking system, or other database
Selection and placement of the right keywords is the core of effective SEO (search engine optimization). Use those terms in the right places in resumes, applications, and social media (especially LinkedIn) and you will be found.

Without the right keywords (for you), in the right places (LinkedIn Profile, resume, application), you are invisible online, and employers clearly do NOT like invisible job candidates.

Exact Keyword Match Is Usually Required

If a recruiter is searching for someone with experience in Microsoft Word, your name won't appear in search results unless your social profile or resume contain the exact term Microsoft Word. Microsoft Office, the product which includes Microsoft Word, is not a match

This means you will not be included in search results for the term Microsoft Word unless you also include that term in the documents.

Currently, most software is not programmed to make assumptions. If a job description requires experience with "Microsoft Word," most systems won't understand that a resume for someone who is "highly skilled with Microsoft Office products" meets that requirement because the exact term "Microsoft Word" is not included. 

Even if you have that experience or skill, you are invisible unless your social profile, application, or resume includes the term being searched.

Building Your Personal SEO with Your Best Keywords

Think like a recruiter filling the job you want next. How is that job described in job postings? What skills, tools, etc. are required?
Research how your target employers define your target job to determine your best keywords, as listed below.
Look through the list below and choose what is appropriate for you. Develop your keywords based on the following categories of information:


Keywords About You, Personally:

1. Your professional name

Most people don't think of their names as important keywords, but in these days of search engines and social media...

Your name is your most important set of keywords. Be consistent!

If your resume or business card is for "Edward J. Jones" but your LinkedIn Profile is for "Ed Jones" (or vice versa), you've made it difficult for a recruiter or employer to make the connection between the two, which most will need to do. Not having a LinkedIn Profile is a negative for most professionals, so using different names can damage opportunities for you.

You need to consistently use the same version of your name for your LinkedIn Profile, resumes, business/networking cards, professional email, meeting name tags and badges, and other visibility so recruiters doing research on you can "connect the dots" between you and your professional visibility. 

[Practice Defensive Googling, and read Your Most Important Keywords for more information on avoiding mistaken online identity and Personal Online Reputation Management for the new necessity today.]

2. Your location (or your target location)


According to LinkedIn, "More than 30% of recruiters use advanced search based on location."

Use the best location for you, but DO have a specific location because using a country is too generic. Not having a location will handicap you in most searches. If appropriate for your location, use both city and state plus regional names -- like Oakland, CA, and East Bay Area, or Manhattan and New York City -- so your profile is in the search results for either.

Do NOT provide your street address. At most, include the city and state. Read How to Safely Publish Your Contact Information on LinkedIn for important tips.

3. Your languages

If you speak more than one language, make it clear the languages that you can speak. Also indicate your level of proficiency -- from "native" through "basic" or "elementary" and whether you can read, write, and/or speak the languages. 


To demonstrate your skills in multiple languages, create a LinkedIn Profile in each of them. LinkedIn allows and encourages this, and it's a great way to gain attention for jobs requiring people who can speak and write in more than one language.

See all 25 Keywords and the complete job-hunt.org article



Tuesday, November 5, 2019

How to Answer “Why Should We Hire You” Questions

Alice Berg

The entire interview narrows down to this single question: Why should we give you this job? And it is probably the hardest part of a job interview. Many applicants who don’t prepare for this type of question don’t make it past the interview stage. It may be the reason you didn’t get hired after a wonderful interview.

But when you have a proper answer prepared, you can actually have an advantage over other applicants. 

Remember, it is your chance to bring attention to some of the outstanding qualities that make you a great candidate for the job.

This article will help you learn:

· Why interviewers like to ask why should we employ you

· The best way to answer this question

· How not to answer when you are asked why they should hire you

“Why Should We Hire You?” — What the Interviewer Is Really Asking?

This question may be asked in different ways but what the interviewer is actually asking is why are you a good fit for this position. They have gone through your resume, cover letter and tested your suitability from the time you started the interview up to this point. What they really want to know, therefore, is if you understand what they are looking for and whether you can offer it.

Already, they think you might be qualified enough for the job; otherwise, they would not invite you for an in-person interview. But there may be one or more applicant just as or more qualified for the job. Thus, answering this question is your one chance to sell your unique skills, qualifications, achievements or abilities.

How to Answer Why Should We Hire You Properly During an Interview - See the answer and the full Medium post